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Edward E Jr

BUSINESS
December 16, 2009 | By Dana Hedgpeth
Fourteen days after taking the helm as chief executive of General Motors, Edward E. Whitacre Jr. said the giant automaker, which went through a major bankruptcy restructuring this year, plans to repay loans from the U.S. and Canadian governments by the end of June. In one of his first face-to-face meetings with reporters at the company's headquarters in Detroit, Whitacre talked about a variety of topics, including his visit to an auto plant last week in Flint, Mich., shuffling top managers and the company's strategy of improving its vehicles, sales and brand image.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
First Union Corp. said Tuesday that it agreed to acquire Florida National Banks of Florida Inc. in a cash and stock deal valued at $749 million. Meanwhile, Chemical Banking Corp. said it would sell its 4.9% stake in Florida National and abandon earlier plans to acquire the Jacksonville, Fla., bank once interstate banking between New York and Florida is permitted. Under the latest deal, First Union would pay $27.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
Even the sparest account of the life of Paul Robeson, the lawyer, actor, singer and civil rights activist who died in 1976, has a mythic power: He accomplished more, against greater odds, than seems quite humanly possible. Phillip Hayes Dean's one-man play “Paul Robeson” (1977), in a revival directed by the playwright at Ebony Repertory Theatre, derives real momentum from this astonishing biography -- then fritters it away. The immensely likable Keith David plays Robeson, alone and reminiscing late in life on a stage, designed by Edward E. Haynes Jr., where a few chairs serve as scenery and props alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Written in the late 1980s and set in 1987, Jeff Stetson's “Fraternity,” now in its Los Angeles premiere at the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center, is a frustrating but fascinating play that has an almost spooky timeliness. The setting, scrupulously evoked by Edward E. Haynes Jr.'s handsome set and Elizabeth Harper's mellow lighting, is an elite black men's club in Birmingham, the gathering place for the city's African American elite. Sen. Charles Lincoln (Roger Robinson), a cocky, cynical political survivor, is running against his former aide, Paul Stanton (Rocky Carroll)
BUSINESS
November 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
SBC Communications Inc. completed its purchase of former parent AT&T Corp. on Friday after California regulators removed the final hurdle for the $16-billion deal. The California Public Utilities Commission also gave its consent to Verizon Communications Inc.'s planned purchase of MCI Inc. for about $7.5 billion, although that deal is still awaiting approval in other states.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1986 | Associated Press
The shake-up in top management at the U.S. Postal Service continued Friday with Postmaster General Albert V. Casey naming seven key executives and promoting Fletcher F. Acord to a new No. 3 job. In the new position, called associate postmaster general, Acord will take charge of marketing, communications, facilities, supplies, employee and labor relations, management information and research technology.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1996 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The week before Christmas, Pacific Telesis Group chief executive Philip J. Quigley flew to Washington to personally knock on the doors of the congressional representatives on whose votes his company's future depended.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2003 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
Cable mogul John Malone is backing News Corp.'s bid for satellite TV leader DirecTV rather than making an offer of his own, ending months of speculation about a potential rivalry between the two longtime media partners. Malone's Liberty Media Corp. and News Corp. jointly announced a financial arrangement Thursday in which Liberty will invest $500 million in News Corp. to help finance a bid for DirecTV parent Hughes Electronics Corp., which could cost at least $3 billion.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1996 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the head of Pacific Telesis Group, Philip J. Quigley was a vigorous supporter of the new federal telecommunications law that allowed telephone companies like his to compete more freely in an era of emerging technologies and eager new rivals. Ironically, the fruits of his success on the regulatory front will result in Quigley's losing his top wrung on the corporate ladder under SBC Communications Inc.'s $16.7-billion takeover proposal for San Francisco-based PacTel.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2002 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Pacific Bell, long a stalwart California name, now is just one more discarded logo for trivia buffs after its parent company scrapped the names of all its operating units Tuesday in favor of initials: SBC. SBC Communications Inc., the country's largest local phone company, made the change to present one brand to compete better against rivals moving into California and SBC's 12 other states.
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