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Edward Elgar

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December 17, 2001 | ANTHONY E. ANDERSON
Daniel Cariaga, a music critic at The Times, does not much care for the symphonies of Edward Elgar. Witness these excerpts taken from his reviews over the years: * First Symphony [May 6, 1995]: "Given the work's laissez-faire structure, ambitious but uninspired melodies and paucity of interesting musical ideas, the early leavers of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion could hardly be chastised."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Some conductors speak to the audience at the Hollywood Bowl. Some don't. It's up to them, but a few well-chosen remarks can be a good way to get an audience's attention. Plus, this summer's new hi-def video screens are meant to bring the intimacy of watching TV in your living room to the immense amphitheater. Last week, the normally talkative and illuminating Michael Tilson Thomas remained unaccountably silent for two infrequent Bowl appearances. British conductor Bramwell Tovey is not an infrequent guest at the Bowl and not one to remain silent under any circumstance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Some conductors speak to the audience at the Hollywood Bowl. Some don't. It's up to them, but a few well-chosen remarks can be a good way to get an audience's attention. Plus, this summer's new hi-def video screens are meant to bring the intimacy of watching TV in your living room to the immense amphitheater. Last week, the normally talkative and illuminating Michael Tilson Thomas remained unaccountably silent for two infrequent Bowl appearances. British conductor Bramwell Tovey is not an infrequent guest at the Bowl and not one to remain silent under any circumstance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2001 | ANTHONY E. ANDERSON
Daniel Cariaga, a music critic at The Times, does not much care for the symphonies of Edward Elgar. Witness these excerpts taken from his reviews over the years: * First Symphony [May 6, 1995]: "Given the work's laissez-faire structure, ambitious but uninspired melodies and paucity of interesting musical ideas, the early leavers of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion could hardly be chastised."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Perhaps it's just millennial blues, but we seem to be having a bit more trouble than usual letting go of our century's favorite figures. Browsing in a book store the other day, for instance, I noticed a new mystery novel in which Groucho Marx is, with full permission of the Groucho estate, the detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H. Reed, head of the London Symphony, according to Reed's written account of the bedside conversation.
NEWS
February 14, 1994
Norman Del Mar, 74, British conductor and author who focused on works of Sir Edward Elgar, Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss. Del Mar began his career as a horn player with the Royal Philharmonic and became an assistant to conductor Sir Thomas Beecham. He made his debut as a conductor in 1947. He led many foreign tours for the philharmonic, the English Chamber Orchestra and Northern Sinfonia and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
British conductor Jeffrey Tate brought the perfect combination of substance and lightness to his second program with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the Hollywood Bowl this week: Ravel's "Mother Goose" Suite and Piano Concerto in G, paired with Edward Elgar's ever-provocative "Enigma" Variations. On Thursday, this agenda resonated neatly and was performed persuasively by the orchestra, which usually responds carefully to this guest conductor's gentle coaxing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Sidonie Goossens, 105, a harpist and the last survivor of a musically distinguished family, died Wednesday at her home in suburban London. Goossens was principal harpist of the BBC Symphony Orchestra from 1930 until her retirement 50 years later. In 1924, according to Grove Music Online, she became the first harpist to broadcast a harp solo. In 1936, she was the first harp soloist to appear on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Mark Swed, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Perhaps it's just millennial blues, but we seem to be having a bit more trouble than usual letting go of our century's favorite figures. Browsing in a book store the other day, for instance, I noticed a new mystery novel in which Groucho Marx is, with full permission of the Groucho estate, the detective.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H. Reed, head of the London Symphony, according to Reed's written account of the bedside conversation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2000 | KATIE COOPER
Gordon Cooper, a member of the original team of American astronauts, will join the New West Symphony Sept. 22 and 23 for its season opener, featuring a performance of Gustav Holst's "The Planets." The Mercury 7 astronaut, one of the men featured in the book and movie "The Right Stuff," will narrate a virtual space voyage featuring film, stills and computer animation of the planets to the accompaniment of Holst's classic suite.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1993 | LAURENCE VITTES
Perhaps it was the excessively unvaried program, but the widely acclaimed and much-recorded Guildhall String Ensemble's concert Friday night at El Camino College never caught fire with the small Marsee Auditorium audience.
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