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Edward Everett Horton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997 | JAMES E. FOWLER
While baby boomers know him as the narrator of "Fractured Fairy Tales" on the old Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoon series, their parents remember former Encino resident Edward Everett Horton as Fred Astaire's foppish sidekick in several 1930s film musicals, including "The Gay Divorcee," "Top Hat" and "Shall We Dance." Although his voice carried aristocratic pretensions, Horton was born in Brooklyn in 1887, the son of the foreman of the New York Times composing room.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997 | JAMES E. FOWLER
While baby boomers know him as the narrator of "Fractured Fairy Tales" on the old Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoon series, their parents remember former Encino resident Edward Everett Horton as Fred Astaire's foppish sidekick in several 1930s film musicals, including "The Gay Divorcee," "Top Hat" and "Shall We Dance." Although his voice carried aristocratic pretensions, Horton was born in Brooklyn in 1887, the son of the foreman of the New York Times composing room.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1989 | Researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
The names of many Los Angeles streets have changed repeatedly over the years, reflecting the city's transformation from a tiny Mexican colonial town to a booming metropolis. Some streets, predictably, honor war heroes and explorers. But others have been named for trees, actors, land developers and--in one case--the proximity of a bullfighting ring. These days, it is not easy to change the name of a street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1991
A burglar who stole goods worth an estimated $40,000 from an Encino man's house had second thoughts about one item--an urn containing the ashes of the homeowner's wife. Los Angeles police said the burglar brought back the urn the day after the burglary with a note of apology. Police learned of the development in the case Friday night when the man called them to ask if they could take fingerprints off the urn, Officer Ted Hanson said.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
The classic 1941 fantasy-romance-comedy about the prizefighter who dies before his time and is sent back to earth to inhabit the body of a murdered industrialist. Charming, urbane; the source for Warren Beatty's "Heaven Can Wait." With Robert Montgomery (pictured) as the boxer, Claude Rains, Edward Everett Horton and Evelyn Keyes (pictured). Directed by Alexander Hall and written by Seton Miller and Sidney Buchman (Cinemax Monday at 7 a.m.).
NEWS
May 4, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
One of two masterpieces of the whole Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers (both pictured) series; the other is "Swing Time." The songs, which include the classically staged "Cheek to Cheek," are by Irving Berlin. Mark Sandrich directs, and in support are series regulars Helen Broderick (the salty sidekick), Edward Everett Horton and Eric Blore (the fey fussbudgets) and Erik Rhodes ("For the woman, the kiss! For the man, the sword!") (AMC early Saturday at 4:45 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2003
REGARDING the "Bullwinkle Is Back" story (by Susan King, Aug. 19), which reported the release of the first season of "Rocky and His Friends" on DVD, we were dismayed not to see the name Daws Butler credited along with the many other talented voice actors involved in the series. Butler not only made up half the team of "Aesop and Son" opposite Charlie Ruggles, but also played a plethora of princes to June Foray's princesses in the "Fractured Fairy Tales," plus countless other character voices which, along with those of Bill Scott, Paul Frees, Hans Conried, Walter Tetley, William Conrad, Edward Everett Horton and the aforementioned Foray and Ruggles, made the "Rocky & Bullwinkle" show the cultural phenomenon that it was. As "Son" might have said to Aesop, "That's quite a story, Pop!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1987 | TERRY ATKINSON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Lost Horizon." RCA/Columbia. $29.95. This 132-minute version of the Frank Capra classic about Shangri-La is a noteworthy restoration project by the American Film Institute--but one could make a case that the original was so deftly cut to 108 minutes (there's also a 117-minute version) that the editing improved the film.
BOOKS
December 30, 2001 | DAVID EHRENSTEIN
"The time has come when we can seriously and without sensationalism assess the gay and lesbian experience of studio-era Hollywood," wrote William J. Mann in "Wisecracker," a biography that explored the very public "private life" of gay silent-era-leading-man-turned-interior-decorator-to the-ruling-class, William Haines.
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