Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEdward F Knipling
IN THE NEWS

Edward F Knipling

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two U.S. scientists who nearly 40 years ago developed a technique now commonly used to control such pests as the Mediterranean fruit fly on Monday were awarded the World Food Prize in a ceremony in Des Moines, Iowa. The food prize, which acknowledges contributions to improving the world food supply, is agriculture's equivalent of the Nobel prizes and carries a monetary award of $200,000. This year's winners are Dr. Edward F. Knipling, 83, of Arlington, Va., and Dr. Raymond C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two U.S. scientists who nearly 40 years ago developed a technique now commonly used to control such pests as the Mediterranean fruit fly on Monday were awarded the World Food Prize in a ceremony in Des Moines, Iowa. The food prize, which acknowledges contributions to improving the world food supply, is agriculture's equivalent of the Nobel prizes and carries a monetary award of $200,000. This year's winners are Dr. Edward F. Knipling, 83, of Arlington, Va., and Dr. Raymond C.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 20, 2000
Edward F. Knipling, 91, who helped develop the radiation method of sterilizing insects harmful to plants, animals and humans. Knipling's greatest contribution was eliminating the screwworm fly in North America and with it a threat to the livestock industry. With R.C. Bushland, Knipling used radiation to sterilize male screwworm flies, which then were released to mate with female flies in the wild. The unfertilized eggs did not hatch and the screwworm population eventually was eliminated.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nori Tanaka, a scruffy, gray-haired entomologist, trudges through a converted tuna-packing shed, flicking flies off his face. It is just before the dawn of another humid day. In one corner of the ramshackle building, workers grind out sticky, brown fly food in a cement mixer. In another, fly pupae are sifted through a makeshift device of cardboard, old broom heads and wire mesh. Tanaka reeks mightily of sugar, yeast and other odors that come with the job of mating insects.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nori Tanaka, a scruffy, gray-haired entomologist, trudges through a converted tuna-packing shed, flicking flies off his face. It is just before the dawn of another humid day. In one corner of the ramshackle building, workers grind out sticky, brown fly food in a cement mixer. In another, fly pupae are sifted through a makeshift device of cardboard, old broom heads and wire mesh. Tanaka reeks mightily of sugar, yeast and other odors that come with the job of mating insects.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nori Tanaka, a scruffy, gray-haired entomologist, trudges through a converted tuna-packing shed, flicking flies off his face. It is just before the dawn of another humid day. In one corner of the ramshackle building, workers grind out sticky, brown fly food in a cement mixer. In another, fly pupae are sifted through a makeshift device of cardboard, old broom heads and wire mesh. Tanaka reeks mightily of sugar, yeast and other odors that come with the job of mating insects.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|