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Edward Goldberg

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NEWS
May 5, 1989 | LINDA ROACHE MONROE, Times Staff Writer
A UC San Diego chemical oceanographer who has concentrated on finding solutions to ocean pollution has been named as co-recipient of the nation's most prestigious environmental science award. Edward Goldberg of UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, will receive the Tyler Prize tonight at a dinner at the Four Seasons Hotel in Los Angeles. Goldberg shares the $150,000 prize with Paul Crutzen, an atmospheric chemist in West Germany, who in 1982 co-wrote the scientific paper that originated the ideas behind what was later termed "nuclear winter."
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NEWS
August 25, 1989 | From the Washington Post
The acting manager of the government's Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant threatened to stop operations Aug. 1 unless he was given formal assurances that he would not be prosecuted for longstanding hazardous waste violations that were likely to continue for some time, informed sources said. The Energy Department, which hired Rockwell International to run the plant, appealed to the Environmental Protection Agency, which enforces the hazardous waste laws, on behalf of Edward S.
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NEWS
August 25, 1989 | From the Washington Post
The acting manager of the government's Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant threatened to stop operations Aug. 1 unless he was given formal assurances that he would not be prosecuted for longstanding hazardous waste violations that were likely to continue for some time, informed sources said. The Energy Department, which hired Rockwell International to run the plant, appealed to the Environmental Protection Agency, which enforces the hazardous waste laws, on behalf of Edward S.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | LINDA ROACHE MONROE, Times Staff Writer
A UC San Diego chemical oceanographer who has concentrated on finding solutions to ocean pollution has been named as co-recipient of the nation's most prestigious environmental science award. Edward Goldberg of UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, will receive the Tyler Prize tonight at a dinner at the Four Seasons Hotel in Los Angeles. Goldberg shares the $150,000 prize with Paul Crutzen, an atmospheric chemist in West Germany, who in 1982 co-wrote the scientific paper that originated the ideas behind what was later termed "nuclear winter."
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Energy Department said today that it is installing a new manager at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Colorado to replace Edward S. Goldberg, who was at the center of a controversy in July over a possible shutdown of the facility. The department said David P. Simonson, a nuclear engineer with 16 years' experience in the federal nuclear weapons program, will take over for Goldberg later this month. Simonson, 46, has been acting deputy manager at Rocky Flats since July 12.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | From the Associated Press
A scientist who helped develop the theory that nuclear war could plunge Earth into a "nuclear winter" will share the 1989 Tyler Prize with a chemist who pioneered studies of ocean pollutants. The prize for environmental achievement, administered by USC, will be awarded tonight to Paul Crutzen, director of atmospheric chemistry at West Germany's Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, and Edward Goldberg, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla. They will split the $150,000 prize money and receive gold medallions, according to the prize committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Edward D. Goldberg, a marine chemist at UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography who studied the effects of ocean pollution, died March 7 at his Encinitas home in northern San Diego County after a long illness, the institute announced. He was 86. A member of the Scripps faculty since 1949, Goldberg helped develop the federally funded Mussel Watch program in the 1970s to measure the levels of contaminants in mussels and other shellfish that concentrate pollutants in their tissue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1989 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Staff Writer
A highly toxic chemical used to keep barnacles off boats was found in "alarmingly high" levels in mussels along the coasts of Orange, Los Angeles, San Diego and Contra Costa counties before it was banned for use on most boats last year, according to a state draft report.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little-known provision of the sweeping Big Green initiative could force Orange County to double the sewer bills of most residents and spend $1.4 billion to improve its system for treating waste before it is pumped into the ocean. As a result, most city and county officials in Orange County oppose the statewide environmental initiative on the Nov.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | David Nelson
The Gaslamp Quarter Foundation commemorated the bicentennial of the French Revolution on Saturday by staging a celebration of 20th-Century American music and dance. Re-creating the storming of the Bastille, after all, would have been difficult to manage, especially in the ballroom of the Omni hotel--just picking up all those discarded knitting needles would have been a nightmare for the housekeeping staff. Party planners opted instead to name the event "An American in Paris," and the 325 guests galloped through its myriad entertainments with a glee that bordered on the Gallic.
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