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Edward Hooper

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the mid-19th century, Londoners were dying by the hundreds from cholera, then a mysterious disease whose origins were unknown. British physician John Snow correctly deduced that the source was the water supply. In one simple action--removing the handle from the Broad Street water pump so residents could not obtain the tainted water--he contained the deadly epidemic. This lesson, one of the earliest examples of medical detective work, haunts British writer Edward Hooper.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the mid-19th century, Londoners were dying by the hundreds from cholera, then a mysterious disease whose origins were unknown. British physician John Snow correctly deduced that the source was the water supply. In one simple action--removing the handle from the Broad Street water pump so residents could not obtain the tainted water--he contained the deadly epidemic. This lesson, one of the earliest examples of medical detective work, haunts British writer Edward Hooper.
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BOOKS
June 2, 1991 | Sharon Dirlam
NOW YOU SEE IT by Cornelia Nixon (Little, Brown & Co. $17.95; 158 pp.). Each of the seven concise chapters tries to understand one character from another character's point of view. In spite of this artful distancing, the reader comes away with a solid acquaintance of the family members under the narrative microscope, if not an intimate appreciation of them. The main character is Edward Hooper, a pipe-smoking professor who travels from Harvard to Berkeley shortly after World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000
A crossing guard was struck and killed outside a North Hollywood elementary school Tuesday morning by a 17-year-old motorist who lost control of his car, police said. The guard, William Edward Hooper, 60, of Tujunga was pronounced dead after being taken to Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, minutes after being hit across the street from Lankershim Elementary School about 7:20 a.m.
NEWS
August 21, 2011
ATF: An article in the Aug. 16 LATExtra section reported that the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives had promoted three field supervisors of a controversial gun-trafficking surveillance operation to management positions at ATF headquarters in Washington. The ATF said in a statement Aug. 17 that the three supervisors were "laterally transferred" from operational duties into administrative roles, and were not promoted. Eisa Davis: An article in the Aug. 14 Arts & Books section about actress-playwright Eisa Davis said her mother Fania worked as a civil rights lawyer ensuring such things as wheelchair-accessible bathrooms and public recycling bins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013
Hilary Koprowski, a Polish-born researcher who developed the first successful oral vaccine for polio, has died. He was 96. Koprowski died of pneumonia April 11 at his Philadelphia home, said his son, Dr. Christopher Koprowski, a radiation oncologist. In 1950, Hilary Koprowski showed that it was possible to use his live-virus oral vaccine against polio, which had plagued the United States and other countries for decades. Another researcher, Dr. Albert Sabin, would win the race to get an oral vaccine licensed in the U.S. while Jonas Salk would develop an injectable vaccine that eliminated much of the disease in the country.
BOOKS
March 5, 2000
Here are the finalists for the 1999 Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. Now in their 20th year, the prizes acknowledge remarkable achievement in eight categories of writing, ranging from fiction and young adult fiction to science and technology. The winners, as well as the recipient of the Robert Kirsch Award (which honors the body of work of a writer living in and / or writing about the American West), will be named in a public ceremony at UCLA's Royce Hall on April 29. General admission is $10.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The controversial idea that a contaminated polio vaccine was responsible for the spread of AIDS in Africa has been discredited by new research released today. Analysis of stored vaccine samples by four independent research groups shows conclusively that they were not contaminated with the AIDS virus, thereby refuting the widely disseminated theory proposed by British author Edward Hooper in his 1999 book, "The River."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000 | RICHARD FAUSSET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A crossing guard was struck and killed outside a North Hollywood elementary school Tuesday morning by a 17-year-old motorist who lost control of his car, police said. The guard, William Edward Hooper, 60, of Tujunga, was pronounced dead at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, minutes after being hit across the street from Lankershim Elementary about 7:20 a.m.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New scientific evidence unveiled Monday appears to undermine a British journalist's controversial theory that the AIDS virus was passed from chimpanzees to humans during testing of a polio vaccine in Africa in the 1950s. Independent tests on samples of the experimental vaccine, warehoused in the United States for nearly half a century, found the DNA of monkeys rather than chimpanzees, lending support to the polio researchers' claims that they never worked with chimp tissue.
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