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Edward I Koch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1986 | United Press International
Edward I. Koch was sworn in to a third term Wednesday as mayor of the nation's largest city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2013 | Geraldine Baum and Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
In the late 1970s when Edward I. Koch won his first term as mayor of New York, the city was in shambles, its coffers and confidence sapped by financial crises and a paralyzing blackout. It needed a fighter and found one in Koch, a well-practiced pol with the determination - and bite - of a bulldog. He steered the city out of bankruptcy and restored its swagger, a one-man cheerleading squad who personified the witty and feisty New Yorker. The three-term mayor of New York and perennial civic combatant, who rallied and riled the city in and out of office with his tenacious style and irrepressible opinions, died Friday of congestive heart failure at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia Hospital, said his friend and spokesman George Arzt.
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NEWS
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Comptroller Harrison J. Goldin, the city's chief financial officer for the last 16 years, formally launched his campaign for mayor Tuesday. Goldin, 53, will run in the Democratic primary against incumbent Edward I. Koch, Manhattan Borough President David N. Dinkins and former Charter Review Commission Chairman Richard Ravitch.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Former New York Mayor Ed Koch, who twice ran against Mario Cuomo for political office, has endorsed Cuomo's son Andrew in his bid for state attorney general. Koch praised the younger Cuomo's tenure as secretary of Housing and Urban Development in the Clinton administration. Koch and Mario Cuomo battled in the 1977 Democratic primary for mayor -- won by Koch -- and the 1982 primary for governor -- won by Cuomo.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Former federal prosecutor Rudolph Giuliani, promising an all-out assault on "crime, crack and corruption," today announced his candidacy for mayor in the battle to unseat Edward I. Koch. Giuliani, who served as U.S. attorney for Manhattan from 1983 until this January, during which time he led the drive against Wall Street insider-trading and won convictions against New York Mafia bosses, will seek the Republican nomination for mayor.
NEWS
May 9, 1988
New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch's approval rating has dropped sharply since his controversial comments about the Rev. Jesse Jackson during the recent New York primary, with his standing suffering most among blacks, according to a poll. The survey, conducted last week for Newsday by the Gallup Organization, found 43% approved of Koch's performance as mayor, while 42% disapproved and 15% had no opinion.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | Associated Press
A sudden drop in blood pressure sent former Mayor Edward I. Koch to the hospital Monday. "I'm OK," Koch, 74, told reporters from his hospital gurney. Dr. Stephen Scheidt, a cardiologist who saw the talkative ex-mayor at the emergency room, called Koch's condition "near syncope," or almost fainting. He said he did not believe that Koch had a heart attack.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Mayor Edward I. Koch had five non-cancerous lesions removed from his face Friday morning. Koch said three were caused by sun exposure and the other two were from an inherited condition. He said a dermatologist gave him a local anesthetic and removed the lesions in about 20 minutes. Koch said no further medical treatment is required and that he has been placed under no restrictions but was warned to avoid prolonged exposure to the sun.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
I just read Josh Getlin's profile of me ("The Ed Koch Show," June 27). I will limit my comments to one overwhelming factual error on the part of Mr. Getlin. He says that I "once criticized news anchorman Dan Rather for allegedly insulting Saudi sensitivities during the Persian Gulf War." That is totally (at) variance with what happened. I prepared a commentary saying that both Rather and CBS owed the American soldiers and their families an apology for having revealed that the soldiers were being entertained in traditional American vaudeville fashion with women participating in the show.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | Associated Press
A sudden drop in blood pressure sent former Mayor Edward I. Koch to the hospital Monday. "I'm OK," Koch, 74, told reporters from his hospital gurney. Dr. Stephen Scheidt, a cardiologist who saw the talkative ex-mayor at the emergency room, called Koch's condition "near syncope," or almost fainting. He said he did not believe that Koch had a heart attack.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
Edward I. Koch collapsed Wednesday at a health club, but doctors said the former mayor was in satisfactory condition and had not suffered a stroke or heart attack. "I'm in good shape. Nobody should worry about me," Koch, 67, said from his hospital bed. "With God's help I came through." Although Koch had an irregular heartbeat shortly after he regained consciousness, his heart was beating normally when he was tested at the hospital. "He looks terrific, sounds fine.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
I just read Josh Getlin's profile of me ("The Ed Koch Show," June 27). I will limit my comments to one overwhelming factual error on the part of Mr. Getlin. He says that I "once criticized news anchorman Dan Rather for allegedly insulting Saudi sensitivities during the Persian Gulf War." That is totally (at) variance with what happened. I prepared a commentary saying that both Rather and CBS owed the American soldiers and their families an apology for having revealed that the soldiers were being entertained in traditional American vaudeville fashion with women participating in the show.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's like a broken car alarm. He's irritating and just won't stop. --Dan Collins, co-author of "I, Koch," a political biography It's 6:40 a.m., and Ed Koch is talking, talking, talking--long before the city has its first cup of coffee. High above the streets, in the study of his Greenwich Village apartment, the former mayor opens his mouth and another round of target practice begins. "As I was s-a-a-a-a-a-ying, I don't like him personally, and he doesn't like me.
NEWS
December 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Former New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch became a casualty of the Palestinian uprising Tuesday when a rock struck and scratched his head as he toured Jerusalem's walled Old City. "I know the stone wasn't meant for me because everyone likes me," Koch joked, then continued his tour with Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek. Koch and Kolleck were walking without a police escort through the narrow streets of an Arab market where all stores were closed for a general strike.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A large contingent of riot-helmeted police guarded the courthouse Thursday where twin juries were considering the fates of two white 19-year-olds accused of playing a principal part in the killing of a black teen-ager in the predominantly white Brooklyn neighborhood of Bensonhurst. The presence of the police underscored not only the explosive potential of the case, but also racial anxiety in the city.
NEWS
March 23, 1989
New York Mayor Edward I. Koch declared a drought emergency and announced tough conservation measures, including a ban on watering lawns. The city also banned all ornamental uses of water, such as fountains, waterfalls and reflecting pools, even if they recirculate the water. "New York won't be as green as usual this year," Koch said. "Tough times require tough measures, and the drought emergency will be a very tough time."
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Mayor Edward I. Koch said Tuesday that the biggest disappointment of his 12 years at City Hall has been not getting credit for helping blacks. "Many people in the black community do not perceive that I was their friend," he told reporters during the last major press conference on his mayoral schedule. Koch, who lost the last election to David N.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time tends to compress the hundreds of news conferences, thousands of public appearances, the emergencies, the dreaded phone calls in the middle of the night when a cop has just been killed. But an inescapable fact remains: A student entering first grade when Edward I. Koch first was elected mayor in 1978 could have started college by the time Koch leaves City Hall in January. On Jan. 1, David N. Dinkins, who defeated Koch in the Democratic primary, takes the oath of office.
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