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Edward J Martin Terminal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Dandelions poke through the cracked sidewalk outside the abandoned, graying Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal at John Wayne Airport. The main concourse that once teemed with passengers is now a darkened shell. A single office chair sits empty. An exposed electrical conduit pops out of the ground where ticket agents' computers once hummed. A nameplate embossed with "Position Closed" rests on the ground like a grave marker.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Dandelions poke through the cracked sidewalk outside the abandoned, graying Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal at John Wayne Airport. The main concourse that once teemed with passengers is now a darkened shell. A single office chair sits empty. An exposed electrical conduit pops out of the ground where ticket agents' computers once hummed. A nameplate embossed with "Position Closed" rests on the ground like a grave marker.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
As they do when John Wayne Airport shuts down each evening, weary airline employees will close up shop at the Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal on Saturday. But under the cover of darkness that night, an army of workers and technicians will swing into action, like stage hands preparing for a Broadway debut. In the space of a few hours, tons of equipment and supplies ranging from computer terminals to baggage tags will be moved from the 23-year-old building into the new, nearby Thomas F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
As they do when John Wayne Airport shuts down each evening, weary airline employees will close up shop at the Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal on Saturday. But under the cover of darkness that night, an army of workers and technicians will swing into action, like stage hands preparing for a Broadway debut. In the space of a few hours, tons of equipment and supplies ranging from computer terminals to baggage tags will be moved from the 23-year-old building into the new, nearby Thomas F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994 | TOM RAGAN
Sparks flew in the early Monday morning fog when a demolition crew started to tear down the Eddie Martin Terminal at John Wayne Airport. Dedicated by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan in May, 1967, the Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal was named after the die-hard pilot who established an airfield in the area in the early 1920s. In those days, Martin was conducting business on a dirt runway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal that could map a new course for general aviation at John Wayne Airport and result in the demolition of the old Edward J. (Eddie) Martin Terminal was approved by the Airport Commission on Wednesday night. The plan was recommended to the Orange County Board of Supervisors on a voice vote, despite concerns about the level of services afforded to the owners and operators of private planes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990
One way to look at the history of Orange County in this century is to think of how its pioneers and visionaries shaped the use of its resources of land, air and waterfront. Two giants, aviator Eddie Martin and planner Kenneth Sampson, died this past week. They were in their 80s. Each left an indelible impression on the way people go about their business here, both at work and at play, in the skies above and on the land below.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the tradition of trying harder, the Avis Rent-a-Car employees sat cross-legged on the floor of John Wayne Airport's new terminal Saturday, happily sorting through a pile of dusty computers and tangled wires. The crew was in the process of moving the guts of the computer system from the company's cramped trailer and into its new home in the lobby of the $63-million Thomas F. Riley Terminal in time for its opening this morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
An electronic flight status board at John Wayne Airport's new Thomas F. Riley Terminal on Tuesday listed a Continental Airlines flight to Bismarck, N.D.--an example of airport workers' humor, since there are no such flights from Orange County. It was also part of the last-minute tests and preparations being conducted for the Sept. 16 opening of the cavernous, $62-million terminal.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY and JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Months late and millions over budget, the cavernous new passenger terminal at Orange County's John Wayne Airport swung open its doors for the first time on Sunday. The 337,900-square-foot terminal generally received rave reviews from a public happy to see a more spacious and luxurious replacement for the cramped, 23-year-old facility just down the runway.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Parking garages flanking south and north ends of main terminal building are linked to both ends of terminal. Fees are $1 per hour, $14 per day, $7 for third day and each following day. Automated, time-coded advance payment is available in terminal. Rentals Avis, Budget, Dollar, General, Hertz and National car rentals are located on lower level (arrivals) near elevators. Alamo, Airways, and Thrifty are off-site.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
I spent July 4th this summer in Warsaw, Poland. As a tip of the hat to visiting American tourists and businessmen, a downtown hotel put on a special "American Independence Day" buffet. And standing at the entrance to the restaurant--in a larger-than-life cardboard cutout, dressed in cowboy garb and brandishing a pistol--was Orange County's own John Wayne.
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