Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEdward J Perkins
IN THE NEWS

Edward J Perkins

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush has announced that he will nominate Edward J. Perkins, a career diplomat and most recently the ambassador to South Africa, as director general of the Foreign Service. If confirmed by the Senate, he would succeed George Vest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a recent luncheon for a score of American executives, former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger introduced the guest speaker, Thomas R. Pickering, the departing U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. "Our distinguished ambassador . . . " Kissinger reportedly intoned, pausing for effect, "too distinguished for some people."
Advertisement
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Tuesday endorsed the nomination of Edward J. Perkins, the U.S. ambassador to South Africa, to be director general of the U.S. Foreign Service. If approved by the full Senate, Perkins, 61, will become the highest-ranking black diplomat in the history of the State Department.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will replace Thomas R. Pickering as ambassador to the United Nations this spring, despite the envoy's reputation as one of the most effective American diplomats ever to serve there, government sources said Monday. The 60-year-old Pickering will be reassigned as ambassador to India and replaced by Edward Perkins, now the State Department's director-general, the agency's chief personnel officer.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Edward J. Perkins said Wednesday that the United States will continue pressing South Africa to end apartheid and to create in its place a society that is "democratic, pluralistic and economically viable."
NEWS
May 23, 1989
U.S. Ambassador Edward Perkins, ending his tour of duty in South Africa, said he remains encouraged by the determination of the black majority to be free despite government suppression. But as he concluded 2 1/2 years as the first black U.S. ambassador to South Africa, Perkins said the most disappointing events of his tenure were the continuation of the government state of emergency to control anti-apartheid protests, the banning of 17 activist groups and the large numbers of people arrested and held without charge under the government's emergency powers.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will replace Thomas R. Pickering as ambassador to the United Nations this spring, despite the envoy's reputation as one of the most effective American diplomats ever to serve there, government sources said Monday. The 60-year-old Pickering will be reassigned as ambassador to India and replaced by Edward Perkins, now the State Department's director-general, the agency's chief personnel officer.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a recent luncheon for a score of American executives, former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger introduced the guest speaker, Thomas R. Pickering, the departing U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. "Our distinguished ambassador . . . " Kissinger reportedly intoned, pausing for effect, "too distinguished for some people."
NEWS
October 9, 1986 | Associated Press
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 12 to 0 Wednesday to recommend that the Senate confirm veteran diplomat Edward J. Perkins to be this country's first black ambassador to white-run South Africa. The action sends the nomination to the Senate floor, where favorable action is expected in the next few days. Perkins, 58, is now the U.S. ambassador to Liberia.
NEWS
November 4, 1986
Edward J. Perkins was sworn in as U.S. ambassador to South Africa, saying he felt "good will" toward all the people of that country, but he vowed to carry with him America's "intolerance of racial apartness." "All Americans share the same goals," the black diplomat told a standing-room-only crowd at his swearing-in ceremony at the State Department. Perkins, 58, replaces Herman J. Nickel.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Tuesday endorsed the nomination of Edward J. Perkins, the U.S. ambassador to South Africa, to be director general of the U.S. Foreign Service. If approved by the full Senate, Perkins, 61, will become the highest-ranking black diplomat in the history of the State Department.
NEWS
May 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush has announced that he will nominate Edward J. Perkins, a career diplomat and most recently the ambassador to South Africa, as director general of the Foreign Service. If confirmed by the Senate, he would succeed George Vest.
NEWS
May 23, 1989
U.S. Ambassador Edward Perkins, ending his tour of duty in South Africa, said he remains encouraged by the determination of the black majority to be free despite government suppression. But as he concluded 2 1/2 years as the first black U.S. ambassador to South Africa, Perkins said the most disappointing events of his tenure were the continuation of the government state of emergency to control anti-apartheid protests, the banning of 17 activist groups and the large numbers of people arrested and held without charge under the government's emergency powers.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Edward J. Perkins said Wednesday that the United States will continue pressing South Africa to end apartheid and to create in its place a society that is "democratic, pluralistic and economically viable."
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee today endorsed the nomination of Edward J. Perkins, the U.S. ambassador to South Africa, to be director general of the U.S. Foreign Service. If approved by the Senate as is expected, Perkins will become the highest-ranking black diplomat in the history of the State Department. Perkins, 61, a native of Sterlington, La., was named the chief U.S. envoy to the South African government in 1986, the first black ever to be named to that post.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | Associated Press
Edward J. Perkins arrived Tuesday to begin work as the first black U.S. ambassador to South Africa, a day after the Pretoria government rebuked the United States by rejecting the visa request of another American official. Perkins made no comment to reporters at Jan Smuts Airport beyond saying he that is "glad to be in South Africa." On Monday, Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha said that South Africa has rejected a visa request from the State Department for Christine Babcock of the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|