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Edward Jay Epstein

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Kokoro Natsume Soseki, translated from the Japanese by Meredith McKinney Penguin Classics: 238 pp., $15 paper This elegant novel of the Meiji period captures the opening in Japanese Confucian culture and the 250-year-old Tokugawa shogunate to the West and Western culture. It was published in 1914, two years before Natsume Soseki's death. "Kokoro," which means "heart," is the story of a friendship between the young narrator and a wise elder -- "sensei" -- who is like a "great gingko tree," a man full of beauty, love and haunting memories.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
Kokoro Natsume Soseki, translated from the Japanese by Meredith McKinney Penguin Classics: 238 pp., $15 paper This elegant novel of the Meiji period captures the opening in Japanese Confucian culture and the 250-year-old Tokugawa shogunate to the West and Western culture. It was published in 1914, two years before Natsume Soseki's death. "Kokoro," which means "heart," is the story of a friendship between the young narrator and a wise elder -- "sensei" -- who is like a "great gingko tree," a man full of beauty, love and haunting memories.
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NEWS
August 1, 1985
Arkady Shevchenko, a CIA spy and the highest-ranking Soviet official ever to defect to the United States, labeled "absolutely ridiculous" an article charging that his best-selling memoirs are a fraud. "I always have a great respect for freedom of the press in the Western world," Shevchenko said. "But it's amazing . . . the way that freedom is used or abused. . . . It's what I call terroristic journalism." The former U. N.
BOOKS
March 12, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
Relying on previously unpublished private papers, recently declassified documents as well as interviews with more than 200 agents, Winks shows how Yale marshaled its intellectual resources to organize the intelligence services during World War II. In addition, he develops full intellectual profiles of key players such as Donald Downes, Norman Holmes Pearson and James Jesis Angleton. "Cloak & Gown," winner of the Intelligence Book of the Year, is a monumental work of research.
BOOKS
March 12, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
Relying on previously unpublished private papers, recently declassified documents as well as interviews with more than 200 agents, Winks shows how Yale marshaled its intellectual resources to organize the intelligence services during World War II. In addition, he develops full intellectual profiles of key players such as Donald Downes, Norman Holmes Pearson and James Jesis Angleton. "Cloak & Gown," winner of the Intelligence Book of the Year, is a monumental work of research.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Michael Milken is talking. Milken--who all but created the "junk bond" business for the investment firm of Drexel Burnham Lambert and whose ties to stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky have been a topic of Wall Street speculation ever since Boesky's $100-million settlement of insider trading charges last November--has long been the silent wonder of investment bankers.
BOOKS
March 1, 1987 | John Rothchild, Rothchild's lighthearted look at investing, "A Fool and His Money," will be published in 1987 by Viking Press
These ESOPS have nothing to do with the fox and the grapes. They're Employee Stock Ownership Plans. Dull topic, I would have agreed, but the Kelsos' book delivers a lot more than it promises. Under their ESOP banner, the authors take on Keynesians, Calvinists, Marxists, Republicans, Democrats, the union movement, standard loan applications, bankers, Friedmanites and conventional bookkeeping.
MAGAZINE
September 27, 1987
Re: "The Junk-Bond King's Next Move" (Aug. 30): As an interested spectator to the money game, I congratulate you on author Edward Jay Epstein's work. He not only shed light on Michael Milken, he illuminated for me the mysteries of the junk-bond business. C. James Christenson Santa Ana
BOOKS
May 30, 1993 | ALEX RAKSIN
BROADCAST BLUES by Eric Burns (HarperCollins: $22; 241 pp.). Eric Burns' vividly reported narrative--the darkest assessment of TV news since Edward Jay Epstein's "News From Nowhere" (1973)--chronicles his 20-year path from an idealistic cub reporter bemused by the cynical old ways of the world to a jaded, bitter man who gets fired after telling his senior producer, "You have the intelligence of a crustacean and the judgment of a slug."
BUSINESS
June 1, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Michael Milken is talking. Milken--who all but created the "junk bond" business for the investment firm of Drexel Burnham Lambert and whose ties to stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky have been a topic of Wall Street speculation ever since Boesky's $100-million settlement of insider trading charges last November--has long been the silent wonder of investment bankers.
BOOKS
March 1, 1987 | John Rothchild, Rothchild's lighthearted look at investing, "A Fool and His Money," will be published in 1987 by Viking Press
These ESOPS have nothing to do with the fox and the grapes. They're Employee Stock Ownership Plans. Dull topic, I would have agreed, but the Kelsos' book delivers a lot more than it promises. Under their ESOP banner, the authors take on Keynesians, Calvinists, Marxists, Republicans, Democrats, the union movement, standard loan applications, bankers, Friedmanites and conventional bookkeeping.
NEWS
August 1, 1985
Arkady Shevchenko, a CIA spy and the highest-ranking Soviet official ever to defect to the United States, labeled "absolutely ridiculous" an article charging that his best-selling memoirs are a fraud. "I always have a great respect for freedom of the press in the Western world," Shevchenko said. "But it's amazing . . . the way that freedom is used or abused. . . . It's what I call terroristic journalism." The former U. N.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Crucially scheduled to air two weeks before Valentine's Day--and just in time for all those thinking of buying their loved one a precious stone--"Frontline's" startling report, "The Diamond Empire" (at 9 tonight on KCET-TV Channel 28 and KPBS-TV Channel 15; 8 p.m. on KVCR-TV Channel 24) should be a red flag for the potential diamond consumer. And for those who've already thrown down hard-earned cash for what may be the world's most overpriced commodity, prepare to get very angry.
OPINION
August 10, 2005 | PATT MORRISON, PATT MORRISON's e-mail address is patt.morrison@latimes.com.
FOR SALE: spacious, high-ceilinged beauty, 2 ba, upgraded sound system, ample off-street parking. Sacrifice." The only real estate going begging in this bubbling market is the space your heinie occupies -- or doesn't -- at the cineplex. Movie attendance is eroding like George W. Bush's approval ratings. Summer -- the season when Hollywood is supposed to make its nut -- has laid an egg: Attendance is 10% below last summer, which wasn't boffo itself.
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