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Edward L Davenport

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992
A Beverly Hills judge ruled Monday that Los Angeles Municipal Judge Edward L. Davenport, whose two trials on charges of drunk driving and refusing to submit to a blood alcohol test ended in hung juries, must face prosecution again. The latest trial ended last week after 13 days in court, an unusually long time for a drunk-driving case. Deputy Dist. Atty. Katherine Mader had offered to drop the second charge in exchange for a guilty plea on the first, but Davenport declined to accept the deal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office tried once and failed. It tried again and failed. Last week, faced with the prospect of crippling layoffs in their office, prosecutors offered Los Angeles Municipal Judge Edward L. Davenport a plea bargain instead of a third trial on drunk-driving charges. He took it. The decision by Davenport, a North Hollywood resident, to plead no contest to a charge of reckless driving came after two full-fledged trials that lasted a total of 23 days and ended in hung juries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992
A second mistrial was declared Wednesday in the drunk-driving case of Los Angeles Municipal Court Judge Edward L. Davenport, a former prosecutor who once won a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that helped establish procedures for trying drunk-driving cases. The vote was 11 to 1 for conviction. Jury members said the dissenting juror refused to be swayed during 2 1/2 days of sometimes angry deliberations. Throughout the 10-day trial, Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office tried once and failed. It tried again and failed. This week, faced with the prospect of crippling layoffs in their office, prosecutors offered Los Angeles Municipal Judge Edward L. Davenport a plea bargain instead of a third trial on drunk-driving charges. He took it. Davenport's decision to plead no contest to a charge of reckless driving came after two full-fledged trials that lasted a total of 23 days and ended in hung juries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office tried once and failed. It tried again and failed. Last week, faced with the prospect of crippling layoffs in their office, prosecutors offered Los Angeles Municipal Judge Edward L. Davenport a plea bargain instead of a third trial on drunk-driving charges. He took it. The decision by Davenport, a North Hollywood resident, to plead no contest to a charge of reckless driving came after two full-fledged trials that lasted a total of 23 days and ended in hung juries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran Los Angeles judge, who as a city attorney earlier in his career helped establish procedures for prosecuting drunk-driving suspects, now faces a drunk-driving charge himself stemming from a traffic accident in Beverly Hills. According to a police report, Municipal Court Judge Edward L. Davenport was profane and abusive to officers, refused to take field sobriety tests and, at the police station, dumped a urine sample into the toilet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Beverly Hills jury is about to decide the drunk driving case of Edward L. Davenport, a Los Angeles Municipal Court judge who once persuaded the U.S. Supreme Court that police are justified in taking blood samples from a drunk driving suspect against the suspect's will. That victory came in 1966, when Davenport, as chief prosecutor for the Los Angeles city attorney's office, helped establish procedures for bringing charges against drunk driving suspects in the city.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The district attorney's office tried once and failed. It tried again and failed. This week, faced with the prospect of crippling layoffs in their office, prosecutors offered Los Angeles Municipal Judge Edward L. Davenport a plea bargain instead of a third trial on drunk-driving charges. He took it. Davenport's decision to plead no contest to a charge of reckless driving came after two full-fledged trials that lasted a total of 23 days and ended in hung juries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1991
The misdemeanor drunk driving trial for Beverly Hills Municipal Court Judge Edward L. Davenport, who as a city attorney helped establish procedures for prosecuting drunk driving suspects, has been scheduled for Oct. 7. Davenport, 63, was arrested May 1 after he was involved in a rear-end collision. He refused to take a field sobriety test and, at the police station, dumped a urine sample into the toilet, according to police reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1993
A Los Angeles Municipal Court judge will plead no contest to a charge of reckless driving rather than face a third trial for driving under the influence of alcohol, his attorney said Tuesday. "It's costing the county a lot and he's taking a lot of time off the bench, and we don't feel it would be productive to go through it again," said Jacob Adajian, who represented Judge Edward L. Davenport in two trials that ended in hung juries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992
A Beverly Hills judge ruled Monday that Los Angeles Municipal Judge Edward L. Davenport, whose two trials on charges of drunk driving and refusing to submit to a blood alcohol test ended in hung juries, must face prosecution again. The latest trial ended last week after 13 days in court, an unusually long time for a drunk-driving case. Deputy Dist. Atty. Katherine Mader had offered to drop the second charge in exchange for a guilty plea on the first, but Davenport declined to accept the deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992
A second mistrial was declared Wednesday in the drunk-driving case of Los Angeles Municipal Court Judge Edward L. Davenport, a former prosecutor who once won a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that helped establish procedures for trying drunk-driving cases. The vote was 11 to 1 for conviction. Jury members said the dissenting juror refused to be swayed during 2 1/2 days of sometimes angry deliberations. Throughout the 10-day trial, Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Beverly Hills jury is about to decide the drunk driving case of Edward L. Davenport, a Los Angeles Municipal Court judge who once persuaded the U.S. Supreme Court that police are justified in taking blood samples from a drunk driving suspect against the suspect's will. That victory came in 1966, when Davenport, as chief prosecutor for the Los Angeles city attorney's office, helped establish procedures for bringing charges against drunk driving suspects in the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran Los Angeles judge, who as a city attorney earlier in his career helped establish procedures for prosecuting drunk-driving suspects, now faces a drunk-driving charge himself stemming from a traffic accident in Beverly Hills. According to a police report, Municipal Court Judge Edward L. Davenport was profane and abusive to officers, refused to take field sobriety tests and, at the police station, dumped a urine sample into the toilet.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
Municipal Court Judge Edward L. Davenport, who as a city attorney helped establish procedures for prosecuting drunk-driving suspects, will go to trial on Oct. 7 to face misdemeanor drunk-driving charges resulting from a traffic accident in Beverly Hills. Davenport, 63, was arrested on May 1 after he was involved in a rear-end collision. He refused to take a field sobriety test and, at the police station, dumped a urine sample into the toilet, according to police reports.
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