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Edward L Rowny

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April 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Edward L. Rowny resigned Thursday as a senior arms control adviser to President Bush. Sources said Rowny resigned over what he felt was undue haste in completing a treaty with the Soviet Union to limit strategic nuclear missiles. "You have served as one of the principal architects of the American policy of peace through strength," Bush said in a letter to the 73-year-old retired Army lieutenant general.
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NEWS
April 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Edward L. Rowny resigned Thursday as a senior arms control adviser to President Bush. Sources said Rowny resigned over what he felt was undue haste in completing a treaty with the Soviet Union to limit strategic nuclear missiles. "You have served as one of the principal architects of the American policy of peace through strength," Bush said in a letter to the 73-year-old retired Army lieutenant general.
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NEWS
May 2, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Edward L. Rowny, President Reagan's special arms control adviser who recently criticized the Administration's stance in its negotiations with the Soviet Union, was told Friday that "there are ways to voice an opinion" without making opposition public, a White House official said. Rowny was summoned to a meeting with White House Chief of Staff Howard H. Baker Jr. after his remarks to reporters prompted concern among Reagan's advisers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989
I read with interest, amusement, and dismay the column by Edward L. Rowny, "Space Is Part of Our Security" (Op-Ed Page, July 18). Interest, because Edward Rowny has been a Reagan-Bush Administration arms control adviser for many years; amusement over the tortured syntax and logic of his article; dismay that he is, indeed, our government's arms control adviser. The meat of Rowny's article is that without an anti-satellite program, the United States and our allies will be at the mercy of the Soviets, who, while complaining about our military space program, are the owners of the "world's only operational anti-satellite (ASAT)
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
With an eye to the Republican right wing, President Bush has decided to reappoint retired Lt. Gen. Edward L. Rowny, 72, as special adviser on arms control issues, Administration officials said Wednesday. The appointment of the hard-line Rowny, who has strong ties to conservative Republicans and the Pentagon, was viewed primarily as an effort to ensure that he will support the strategic arms reduction (START) agreement with the Soviets that is being negotiated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1989
I read with interest, amusement, and dismay the column by Edward L. Rowny, "Space Is Part of Our Security" (Op-Ed Page, July 18). Interest, because Edward Rowny has been a Reagan-Bush Administration arms control adviser for many years; amusement over the tortured syntax and logic of his article; dismay that he is, indeed, our government's arms control adviser. The meat of Rowny's article is that without an anti-satellite program, the United States and our allies will be at the mercy of the Soviets, who, while complaining about our military space program, are the owners of the "world's only operational anti-satellite (ASAT)
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
Veering sharply away from Administration policy, Edward L. Rowny, President Reagan's arms control adviser, said Monday that the United States should seriously consider insisting on major changes in the nuclear arms reduction agreement being negotiated with the Soviet Union. Rowny called criticism by Richard M. Nixon and Henry A. Kissinger of the proposed agreement "refreshing and helpful."
NEWS
February 16, 1988
The United States has told the Soviet Union that verification procedures worked out for medium-range missiles will not suffice for the strategic arms talks that resume in Geneva this week, senior arms control adviser Edward L. Rowny said. "We are calling for tough measures which will assure that we can verify Soviet compliance," Rowny told the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science in Boston.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | United Press International
The Reagan Administration will send two special envoys to consult with American allies about a tentative response to the latest Soviet arms control proposal, The New York Times said in its Sunday edition. Paul H. Nitze, adviser to Secretary of State George P. Shultz, will talk with European allies while Edward L. Rowny, arms-control adviser to President Reagan, will go to Canada and Asia, the paper said, quoting unidentified Administration officials.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze are making arrangements to meet in Washington in mid-July to try to clear obstacles to a treaty on intermediate nuclear missiles, arms control adviser Edward L. Rowny and other U.S. officials said Tuesday. Rowny told reporters at a news conference in Geneva that he did not know whether a specific date has been fixed for the meeting. A U.S.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
With an eye to the Republican right wing, President Bush has decided to reappoint retired Lt. Gen. Edward L. Rowny, 72, as special adviser on arms control issues, Administration officials said Wednesday. The appointment of the hard-line Rowny, who has strong ties to conservative Republicans and the Pentagon, was viewed primarily as an effort to ensure that he will support the strategic arms reduction (START) agreement with the Soviets that is being negotiated.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Edward L. Rowny, President Reagan's special arms control adviser who recently criticized the Administration's stance in its negotiations with the Soviet Union, was told Friday that "there are ways to voice an opinion" without making opposition public, a White House official said. Rowny was summoned to a meeting with White House Chief of Staff Howard H. Baker Jr. after his remarks to reporters prompted concern among Reagan's advisers.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
Veering sharply away from Administration policy, Edward L. Rowny, President Reagan's arms control adviser, said Monday that the United States should seriously consider insisting on major changes in the nuclear arms reduction agreement being negotiated with the Soviet Union. Rowny called criticism by Richard M. Nixon and Henry A. Kissinger of the proposed agreement "refreshing and helpful."
NEWS
April 14, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan and his top advisers will meet at the White House on Wednesday for a pivotal session on whether to exceed the limits on nuclear missiles under the controversial 1979 SALT II treaty with the Soviet Union, a U.S. official said today. The official, who demanded anonymity, said most of the presidential advisers are in favor of going past the ceiling when a new Trident nuclear submarine begins sea trials next month.
NEWS
April 2, 1985 | Associated Press
The Geneva arms control talks aren't going anywhere as long as Moscow continues to focus on the U.S. "Star Wars" project, Edward L. Rowny, special adviser to the President on arms control matters, said today. Rowny said Moscow is avoiding discussing curbs on offensive nuclear arms, which he said is the main object of the talks that opened March 12. Rowny's remarks were the most explicit statement by a senior Administration official yet that the talks have so far been disappointing.
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