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Edward L Schneider

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NEWS
May 2, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The aging of America will escalate health-care costs in a way that no "cost containment" will be able to control, according to a new federal study that the researchers say supports the growing demand for more public funding for research into diseases of the elderly. The study's authors, from USC and the National Institute on Aging, predict a threefold increase in Medicare costs by the year 2040.
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NEWS
May 2, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The aging of America will escalate health-care costs in a way that no "cost containment" will be able to control, according to a new federal study that the researchers say supports the growing demand for more public funding for research into diseases of the elderly. The study's authors, from USC and the National Institute on Aging, predict a threefold increase in Medicare costs by the year 2040.
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NEWS
December 9, 1986
Appointment of Dr. Edward L. Schneider, former deputy director of the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health, as dean of USC's Andrus Gerontology Center and Leonard Davis School of Gerontology was announced by Dr. Cornelius Pings, USC provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. Schneider replaces Dr. James E. Birren, who retired in June to become professor and director of USC's Institute for Advanced Study in Gerontology and Geriatrics.
NEWS
August 9, 1988
A new Ph.D. program in gerontology with an emphasis on public policy--said to be the first of its kind in the United States--will be offered beginning in September of 1989 by the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. Edward L. Schneider, M. D., dean of USC's Andrus Gerontology Center and Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, announced the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonard Davis, who pioneered insurance plans for elderly people, helped establish the AARP and through his philanthropy made USC the nation's leading university in gerontology studies and care, has died. He was 76. Davis, the driving force behind USC's Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center and creator of its Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, died Jan. 15 of congestive heart failure while on a cruise to South America. The New York native had lived in Palm Beach, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1989 | Nona Yates
The shore birds of Southern California are the focus of an exhibit featuring the work of wildlife research photographer B. (Moose) Peterson now at the Cabrillo Marine Museum in San Pedro. A flock of avocets, a snowy egret and two endangered species, the light-footed clapper rail and Belding's savanna sparrow, are some of the birds profiled by Peterson in the exhibit. Over the years, Peterson has photographed almost 300 species of birds, primarily for research projects in California.
NEWS
May 16, 1985 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Diet, exercise and vitamins have no proven value in helping people extend their life spans, the deputy director of the National Institute on Aging said Wednesday. The medical profession does not know of any definitive way to slow the aging process, conceded Dr. Edward L. Schneider, who warned that "medical quackery is a multibillion-dollar industry" featuring claims for increasing life span.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1989 | NONA YATES
A solar eclipse occurs when the moon moves between the sun and Earth, briefly blocking part or all of the sun's light. A partial eclipse will occur on the morning of March 7 and will be visible in Southern California. As seen from Los Angeles, the eclipse will begin at 8:55 a.m. and end at 10:47 a.m. At maximum, which occurs at 9:50 a.m., 36% of the sun's image will be obscured by the moon, according to the Griffith Observatory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2002 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After watching his beloved grandfather succumb to cancer more than 50 years ago, Paul F. Glenn promised himself that if he ever became wealthy, he would donate generously to medical research. Glenn, now 71 and head of a venture capital firm in Santa Barbara, went on to earn a fortune as a commodities speculator. And, true to his pledge, he gave USC $1.6 million in the mid-1990s to promote medical research on aging. But that touching story hasn't had a fairy-tale ending.
FOOD
April 17, 1986 | SANDY ROVNER, The Washington Post
Stanley N. Gershoff, dean of the Tufts University School of Nutrition, remembers a graph he saw a few years ago that showed the relationship of age to various human functions. "No matter what you looked at," he recalled recently, "whether it was hearing, sight, lung capacity, kidney function, heart function, the slope kept going down as age went up. Everything starts going down somewhere in the 20s for as long as you live."
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross W. Cortese, the onetime fruit-stand peddler whose vision of active havens for the aging led to a nationwide series of planned communities that he called Leisure World, has died of the complications of abdominal surgery. A company spokesman said Wednesday that Cortese died Tuesday at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange. Cortese was 74 and had undergone unrelated cancer surgery in July, said William V. March, a longtime friend and colleague.
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