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Edward Lebowitz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1988
Hal Speers Rachman, a 41-year-old registered nurse, pleaded no contest Monday in Santa Monica Superior Court to charges that he attempted to murder an AIDS patient and to five counts of forgery in seeking to steal $32,000 from the man's bank and credit card accounts. Rachman, a Venice resident, is expected to be ordered to serve nine years in prison when he is sentenced Aug. 1, according Deputy Dist. Atty. Richard de la Sota. Rachman was accused of calling St.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
A nurse who tried to kill an AIDS patient with an overdose of insulin, then looted the man's bank accounts, was sentenced to nine years in prison Monday by a Superior Court judge in Santa Monica. Hal Speers Rachman, 41, of Venice had pleaded no contest to attempted murder charges stemming from a telephone call he made to St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica in which he impersonated a doctor and ordered an insulin injection for Edward S. Lebowitz.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
A nurse who tried to kill an AIDS patient with an overdose of insulin, then looted the man's bank accounts, was sentenced to nine years in prison Monday by a Superior Court judge in Santa Monica. Hal Speers Rachman, 41, of Venice had pleaded no contest to attempted murder charges stemming from a telephone call he made to St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica in which he impersonated a doctor and ordered an insulin injection for Edward S. Lebowitz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1988
Hal Speers Rachman, a 41-year-old registered nurse, pleaded no contest Monday in Santa Monica Superior Court to charges that he attempted to murder an AIDS patient and to five counts of forgery in seeking to steal $32,000 from the man's bank and credit card accounts. Rachman, a Venice resident, is expected to be ordered to serve nine years in prison when he is sentenced Aug. 1, according Deputy Dist. Atty. Richard de la Sota. Rachman was accused of calling St.
NEWS
October 16, 1986
A nurse suspected of posing as a doctor and telephoning a Santa Monica hospital with a potentially lethal prescription for an AIDS patient was ordered to stand trial for attempted murder Wednesday. Hal Speers Rachman will be arraigned in Santa Monica Superior Court next week on 17 felony counts. Charges against him include telephoning the phony prescription for Edward Lebowitz, who died Sept. 24 of complications from acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
October 17, 1986
Santa Monica police are investigating a tip that nurse Hal Speers Rachman fraudulently used the credit cards of a number of AIDS victims in his care, in addition to allegedly trying to kill patient Edward Lebowitz last month while looting his accounts of $32,000, authorities said. The new investigation into Rachman, 39, is in a preliminary stage, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Paul Takajian, who is prosecuting the Venice man, and Santa Monica Police Detective Ray Cooper, chief investigator of the case.
NEWS
August 1, 1988
A registered nurse who tried to kill an AIDS patient by prescribing insulin was sentenced today to nine years in state prison. Santa Monica Superior Court Judge Laurence J. Rittenband imposed the sentence on Hal Rachman, 42, who had pleaded no contest to attempted murder and five counts of forgery in prescribing insulin for Edward Lebowitz, 49. A man pretending to be a doctor telephoned St. John's Hospital and Health Center last Sept. 20 and ordered an insulin injection for Lebowitz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1986
The Wife: Police found Rachman's wife, Vickie Sue Speers, extremely cooperative and "very jovial." It was her responses, the file says, that led to Rachman's arrest. She said he explained having money by saying the bank had made a $2,000 error in his accounts. She said she thought he did make a call St. John's Hospital on Sept. 20, something unusual because her husband "usually doesn't take a personal interest in his patients."
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | NIESON HIMMEL and EDWARD J. BOYER, Times Staff Writers
An AIDS patient who survived a near-fatal dose of insulin ordered by a man who called Santa Monica's St. John's Hospital posing as his doctor, died Wednesday of the disease, a hospital spokeswoman said. The patient, identified by the coroner's office as Edward Lebowitz, 48, of Los Angeles died at 1:55 p.m. "due to complications related directly to his illness," the spokeswoman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1986 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Attempted murder, grand theft, forgery and credit card fraud charges will be filed today against the nurse who is alleged to have called in a insulin prescription for hospitalized AIDS patient Edward Lebowitz, the district attorney's office said Tuesday. District attorney's spokesman Al Albergate said additional charges could be filed against Hal Speers Rachman, 39, of Venice. Although the coroner's office has ruled that Lebowitz, who died at a Santa Monica hospital four days after the Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1986 | DAVE PALERMO, Times Staff Writer
An autopsy performed Sunday confirmed that the death of AIDS patient Edward Lebowitz was not caused by a potentially lethal dose of insulin allegedly prescribed by a registered nurse accused of stealing tens of thousands of dollars from Lebowitz. Lebowitz, 48, died Wednesday of metastic Kaposi's sarcoma, a form of cancer, and other complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County coroner's office said. Lebowitz was a patient at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1986 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
St. John's Hospital nurse Robin A. Shean told the caller--who claimed he was Edward Lebowitz's doctor--that the patient's blood-sugar level was in the low normal range and that she feared the insulin injection might have negative effects, according to the police report. 'Yes, I know,' the man allegedly replied. 'But that's OK. I want to keep the blood sugar low and I don't want the night shift calling me back.' The St.
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