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Edward Levi

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March 8, 2000 | Associated Press
Edward Levi, the U.S. attorney general who helped rebuild a Justice Department crippled by the Watergate scandal, died Tuesday after a seven-year battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was 88. Levi had risen through the ranks to become president of the University of Chicago when he was tapped as attorney general. He served in the post from 1975 to 1977. Levi had taught at the University of Chicago Law School, becoming dean in 1950.
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NEWS
March 8, 2000 | Associated Press
Edward Levi, the U.S. attorney general who helped rebuild a Justice Department crippled by the Watergate scandal, died Tuesday after a seven-year battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was 88. Levi had risen through the ranks to become president of the University of Chicago when he was tapped as attorney general. He served in the post from 1975 to 1977. Levi had taught at the University of Chicago Law School, becoming dean in 1950.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aaron Director, a University of Chicago scholar who influenced scores of legal minds through his work joining the fields of law and economics, has died. He was 102. Director died Saturday at his retirement home in Los Altos Hills, Calif., the university announced Monday. The cause of death was not reported. A passionate defender of free markets, Director was among the first U.S. scholars to apply the principles of economics to legal reasoning.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Attorney general nominee Richard L. Thornburgh denied at his confirmation hearing today that he was involved in withholding from Congress a 1975 report detailing alleged drug trafficking by Panamanian officials. There was sharp questioning about the report by several Senate Judiciary Committee members at a generally friendly hearing in which the former Pennsylvania governor was widely praised as the choice to succeed Edwin Meese III.
OPINION
April 23, 2007
THE UNKINDEST CUTS for Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales during last week's appalling appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee came not from Democrats but from fellow Republicans. Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) told the attorney general that he should resign. Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) observed that Gonzales' credibility had been "significantly impaired." Sooner or later, Gonzales or President Bush will take the hint. The question then becomes: What sort of replacement should Bush nominate?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bernard D. Meltzer, 92, a labor law scholar who helped draft the charter of the United Nations and served as a prosecutor at the Nuremberg war crime trials after World War II, died Thursday at home in Chicago, according to the University of Chicago Law School, where he was the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. A cause of death was not given.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
California Supreme Court Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas said Friday that he sees no "constitutional deprivation" of rights which could require overturning Proposition 65, a measure passed overwhelmingly by voters last year to establish English as the state's official language.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The Administration beat a tactical retreat on one component of its anti-terrorism package Wednesday, even as it disclosed a new interpretation of internal guidelines that will give the FBI somewhat greater latitude to investigate domestic organizations suspected of encouraging terrorism. FBI Director Louis J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1985
Tension will always exist between the power that law enforcement must have to defend society from violence and the restraints on that power to protect society from abusive authority. The history of the 1960s and the early 1970s demonstrates that the competing claims of security and individual freedom are not a theoretical problem, but one of vital importance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1987
Claremont Graduate School held its 60th annual commencement ceremonies Saturday in Bridges Auditorium. Archibald Cox, former Watergate special prosecutor and Carl M. Loeb University professor emeritus at Harvard University, delivered the keynote address. He asked, "How could a charter of government written in 1787 serve so well through 200 years of constant change?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1988 | FREDERICK D. BARON and NELSON G. DONG, Frederick D. Baron served as a special assistant to Atty. Gen. Griffin Bell and subsequently as a federal prosecutor. Nelson G. Dong was a White House fellow under Bell and also served as a federal prosecutor. Baron now practices law in Palo Alto, Dong practices in San Francisco
Increasingly there are demands that Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III should step down, but the focus on his possible indictment on criminal charges is misplaced. The question that should determine his continued tenure is this: Does he understand the higher standard to which the attorney general must be held--and how does he measure against that standard? It is a mistake to read the departures of Deputy Atty. Gen. Arnold Burns and Assistant Atty. Gen.
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