Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEdward Lu
IN THE NEWS

Edward Lu

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
April 2, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
American astronaut Edward Lu and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, who performed a spacewalk together in 1997, will return to the international space station this month and replace its current crew, NASA said in Houston. Lu, 39, a physicist, and Malenchenko, 41, a pilot and engineer, should have flown to the space station last month on the shuttle Atlantis. But the Columbia catastrophe grounded NASA's shuttles. They are scheduled to lift off April 26 from Kazakhstan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 2, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
American astronaut Edward Lu and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, who performed a spacewalk together in 1997, will return to the international space station this month and replace its current crew, NASA said in Houston. Lu, 39, a physicist, and Malenchenko, 41, a pilot and engineer, should have flown to the space station last month on the shuttle Atlantis. But the Columbia catastrophe grounded NASA's shuttles. They are scheduled to lift off April 26 from Kazakhstan.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
April 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
Astronauts aboard the international space station ventured outside for more than six hours Tuesday to wrap up maintenance tasks on what was probably the last spacewalk for months. Commander Ken Bowersox and science officer Don Pettit finished their work early and spent an extra 80 minutes collecting tools and tethers that had been left outside during previous spacewalks. Russian flight engineer Nikolai Budarin assisted from inside the station, orbiting 240 miles above Earth.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2003 | From Associated Press
The bride blew the groom a kiss. He blew one back -- from about 240 miles above Earth. Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko didn't let the fact that he's living aboard the international space station stop him from marrying his earthbound bride, Ekaterina Dmitriev, in the first wedding conducted from space. The couple wed Sunday before family and friends in a private ceremony at Johnson Space Center in Houston, where Malenchenko took part via video.
SCIENCE
November 12, 2005 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
A little gentle persuasion might accomplish more than powerful missiles to keep the Earth safe from rogue asteroids. Instead of trying to blow up an oncoming space rock, all that's needed is a large enough spaceship to gradually tug the asteroid off course using the space-warping effects of gravity, NASA scientists reported Thursday in the journal Nature. "It will take a couple of decades of advance notice," said Edward Lu, a former astronaut and a researcher at Johnson Space Center in Houston.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
Hawthorne rocket venture Space Exploration Technologies Corp.  announced it has assembled a team of independent experts to help the company create a safe spacecraft for NASA astronauts. The company, better known as SpaceX, is already building its Falcon 9 rockets and Dragon capsules to deliver cargo to the International Space Station and has a $1.6-billion contract to do just that for NASA. SpaceX plans to send its unmanned Dragon capsule to dock with the International Space Station on April 30 from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in a demonstration flight for NASA.
NEWS
September 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
The space shuttle Atlantis blasted into orbit Friday and gave chase to the international space station, providing a perfect kickoff to the torrent of launches that lies ahead. It was the first time a shuttle took off on its first try since John Glenn's return to orbit in 1998. What's more, Atlantis' launch was flawless--welcome news for a space agency planning to fly to the space station eight times over the next year. "It's a great day," said NASA's new launch director, Mike Leinbach.
WORLD
May 4, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A Russian Soyuz spaceship carrying a three-man U.S.-Russian crew back from the orbiting international space station touched down safely in the remote steppes of Kazakhstan today in the first spacecraft landing since the Columbia shuttle disaster. Helicopter crews engaged in an intense search for the capsule for 2 1/2 hours after it apparently landed as much as 250 miles off target.
WORLD
April 29, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A Soyuz spaceship carrying a U.S.-Russian crew docked successfully at the orbiting international space station Monday, boosting the spirits of space officials from both countries and thrilling relatives of U.S. astronaut Edward Lu. "I feel so happy and so proud," said Snowlily Lu of Fremont, Calif., the U.S. astronaut's mother, after she watched the linkup on a giant video screen at Mission Control just outside Moscow. "Everyone worked for this goal, and now we saw such a successful result."
WORLD
October 21, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A Soyuz spaceship with a three-person crew, including two of the world's most experienced astronauts, docked successfully at the international space station Monday. With the American shuttle fleet grounded because of the February breakup of the space shuttle Columbia, the three-seat Russian Soyuz is the only means of ferrying crews to and from the orbiting station. A Soyuz is always attached to the station as an emergency escape vehicle.
WORLD
April 4, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Fearing that the international space station might have to be left in orbit without a crew, the Russian government on Thursday accelerated funding to build space vehicles. Yuri Koptev, director of the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, told reporters that the Russian Cabinet has approved the early release of $38 million, budgeted for the second half of the year. The government also tentatively promised to boost the agency's budget to $240 million next year from $130 million this year, he said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|