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Edward Mccabe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Edward McCabe was a pediatric fellow in Colorado, fresh out of medical school, in 1976 when he first met Joel and Kevin. Only 2 and 3 years old, respectively, the brothers were short, physically weak and severely retarded, with IQs in the 30s. They had triangular, elfin faces, crossed eyes and remarkably sweet dispositions. That chance encounter changed his life, says McCabe, who recently moved to UCLA, steering him in a career direction he had not anticipated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Dr. Edward McCabe was a pediatric fellow in Colorado, fresh out of medical school, in 1976 when he first met Joel and Kevin. Only 2 and 3 years old, respectively, the brothers were short, physically weak and severely retarded, with IQs in the 30s. They had triangular, elfin faces, crossed eyes and remarkably sweet dispositions. That chance encounter changed his life, says McCabe, who recently moved to UCLA, steering him in a career direction he had not anticipated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998
Five UCLA Bruins football team members were among volunteers who held a "Smoothie Fest" for patients at the UCLA Children's Hospital this week. Bruin quarterback Cade McNown and his teammates helped hospital officials and the staff of the Maui Beach Cafe mix fruit smoothies Tuesday for about 30 children, said Jeff Knight, who organized the event and owns the restaurant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1998
The late singer Nicolette Larson's husband, daughter and friends presented a donation of $166,000 to the UCLA Children's Hospital on Thursday. Larson's husband, drummer Russell Kunkel, and the couple's daughter, Elsie May, were joined by musician Graham Nash for the presentation to Dr. Edward McCabe, the hospital's chief physician. The money will be used to create the Nicolette Larson Endowment for the Children's Hospital and the department of pediatrics, McCabe said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1995
The sign outside the UCLA Medical Center's pediatrics department soon will read "UCLA Children's Hospital." The name change has occurred since the medical center in Westwood was accepted for membership in the National Assn. of Children's Hospitals and Related Facilities. The association sets criteria for children's hospitals nationwide and is the premier membership group for pediatric hospitals, which are not accredited.
HEALTH
July 28, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Had David Denney's condition been detected shortly after birth and treated with a special diet, the boy, now 8 years old, would have developed normally. He would be able to speak and feed himself and wouldn't need the now ever-present wheelchair. But David was born before January 2002, when California's program to screen newborns for serious inherited disorders was expanded from four conditions to about 30.
HEALTH
October 5, 1998 | JEANNINE STEIN
Babies are fascinating creatures, changing remarkably from week to week, month to month. In the course of one year a baby develops from a squirming little bundle to a walking, talking child with a distinct personality. This one-year timeline is a general guide for parents. Dr. Barbara Korsch, professor of pediatrics at Childrens Hospital in Los Angeles, and Dr.
SCIENCE
December 31, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
All pregnant women, regardless of their age, should be offered screening for Down syndrome in their first trimester, according to new practice guidelines issued today by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Noninvasive screening tests developed over the last decade have made it possible to predict the risk of Down syndrome and certain other chromosomal abnormalities with high accuracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2000 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They had planned to trek across the world, a couple of newlyweds from Southern California and their infant daughter. The Greek isle of Mykonos was as good a starting place as any. They didn't need much money. He taught scuba diving; she was a manicurist. But by their daughter's first birthday, she hadn't said a word--not even baby talk. She hadn't taken a step, either. Her rattles held no interest. Six months later, nothing had changed. Actually, everything had changed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a delicate dance, a struggle to find the right words to console grieving parents while also asking for permission to harvest their dead child's organs. The physicians and scientists at Children's Hospital of Orange County do their best to gently explain that the only way to find a cure or prevent childhood disorders ranging from autism to cerebral palsy is to dissect and research brain and organ tissue from young sufferers.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1988 | TOM PIRKO, TOM PIRKO is president of Bevmark Inc., a Los Angeles-based management consulting firm.
Their guns are trained on us. Soon Michael S. Dukakis and George Bush, in consort with their media advisers, will blast away with interminable television and radio commercials. The public will stare back and sigh. Almost by tradition, political advertising is a notoriously gross craft, full of obvious manipulation and hype. Its general strategy seems to be: Bludgeon the populace and hope for the best. This is not to say there hasn't been some successful political advertising.
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