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Edward Roski

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SPORTS
December 28, 1997 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The optimist sees the doughnut, as they say, while the pessimist sees the hole. So after months of political grappling to earn Los Angeles City Council approval for a planned $300-million downtown hockey and basketball arena, Edward Roski is champing at the bit to continue an even tougher battle: bringing the National Football League back to the Coliseum.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward P. Roski Jr., who is bidding to land a National Football League expansion for a refurbished Los Angeles Coliseum, owns a casino in Las Vegas--an apparent conflict under league rules. Roski operates the Silverton Hotel Casino and RV Park, which he opened about 18 months ago when the previous casino went bust. Roski--who owns the property--had been leasing the site to operators of the Boomtown casino.
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NEWS
August 17, 1996 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making the first official move, Los Angeles Kings owner Edward Roski signed and sent a proposal Friday offering to build a sports and entertainment arena next to the downtown Los Angeles Convention Center if Los Angeles agrees to a complex financing plan. Under the terms of the nonbinding proposal, the $200-million-plus arena would become home to the Kings and Lakers for the 1999-2000 season. The teams would be obligated to play in the arena for 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998 | ROBERT A. JONES
Last fall, a friend and I found ourselves on a morbid search through downtown. We had been attracted by the notice of an art show being staged in the ruins of an abandoned bank building. We weren't much interested in the art. What intrigued us was the building itself. We wanted to examine the remains of a corporate corpse. According to the notice, this particular structure was not one of those long-dead buildings along Spring Street that have stood empty and forlorn for more than a decade now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998 | ROBERT A. JONES
Last fall, a friend and I found ourselves on a morbid search through downtown. We had been attracted by the notice of an art show being staged in the ruins of an abandoned bank building. We weren't much interested in the art. What intrigued us was the building itself. We wanted to examine the remains of a corporate corpse. According to the notice, this particular structure was not one of those long-dead buildings along Spring Street that have stood empty and forlorn for more than a decade now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward P. Roski Jr., who is bidding to land a National Football League expansion for a refurbished Los Angeles Coliseum, owns a casino in Las Vegas--an apparent conflict under league rules. Roski operates the Silverton Hotel Casino and RV Park, which he opened about 18 months ago when the previous casino went bust. Roski--who owns the property--had been leasing the site to operators of the Boomtown casino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1990
A group of businessmen has sued the mayor, two city councilmen and the city attorney of Industry, accusing them of conspiring to spend public money for their own benefit. The suit, filed Wednesday in Pomona Superior Court, alleges several financial conflicts of interest, including land leases to Mayor John Ferrero and his son, Councilman John Paul Ferrero, and waste-hauling contracts to a firm owned by Councilman Patrick Perez. It says City Atty. Graham Ritchie helped arrange the deals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1997
Re Edward Roski's statement about the NFL coming back to Los Angeles ("I think Southern California suffered tremendously when the Rams moved from the Coliseum," May 16): Do not group me into the category of Southern Californians who wish to see a return of the NFL to Los Angeles. I was never a Rams or Raiders fan to begin with. I am an NFL fan who enjoys watching the best games of the week on television rather than being forced to watch my so-called home team. Wake up, Roski and Los Angeles; not everyone in Southern California roots for the home teams.
SPORTS
September 30, 1995 | LISA DILLMAN
As expected, the NHL's Board of Governors on Friday approved the sale of the Kings to Denver billionaire Philip F. Anschutz and local developer Edward P. Roski Jr. The board, meeting in New York, voted unanimously on the pending transaction, which now faces a Thursday hearing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The hearing is expected to be a formality, though there is a remote possibility of an overbid offer.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2002 | From a Times staff writer
Majestic Realty Co., one of the nation's largest industrial and commercial real estate developers, named David A. Wheeler as president. Wheeler, 47, succeeds Edward P. Roski Jr., who will remain as chairman of the board and chief executive of the City of Industry-based company. Wheeler joined Majestic Realty in 1977 and has been involved in the development of some of the company's large master-planned business and industrial parks. Wheeler is also a member of the company's board.
SPORTS
December 28, 1997 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The optimist sees the doughnut, as they say, while the pessimist sees the hole. So after months of political grappling to earn Los Angeles City Council approval for a planned $300-million downtown hockey and basketball arena, Edward Roski is champing at the bit to continue an even tougher battle: bringing the National Football League back to the Coliseum.
NEWS
August 17, 1996 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making the first official move, Los Angeles Kings owner Edward Roski signed and sent a proposal Friday offering to build a sports and entertainment arena next to the downtown Los Angeles Convention Center if Los Angeles agrees to a complex financing plan. Under the terms of the nonbinding proposal, the $200-million-plus arena would become home to the Kings and Lakers for the 1999-2000 season. The teams would be obligated to play in the arena for 25 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1997
Developers of the proposed downtown sports arena said Wednesday that they have had discussions with Bank of America about providing the city of Los Angeles with a guaranty to repay $70 million in city-backed bonds.
SPORTS
May 17, 1997 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first 24 hours of their drive to return professional football to Los Angeles, the owners of the Kings received $450,000 from local businesses Friday in the form of 45 signed checks and commitments for luxury suites to a proposed new Coliseum. The proposed new Coliseum will feature 140 suites, and work will continue through the weekend to acquire additional $10,000 deposits with the intention of delivering signed commitments to the NFL owners at their spring meetings in San Diego Monday.
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