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Edward S Feldman

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
A newly recapitalized Atlantic Entertainment Group has agreed to distribute the controversial film "Wired" this summer to 600-800 American theaters. (The announcement was made late Wednesday and was included in some editions of Thursday's Calendar.) The agreement came four weeks after plans to distribute "Wired" were dropped by New Visions Pictures, allegedly because of pressure from Creative Artists Agency. Both CAA and New Visions officials denied these reports. Atlantic President Jonathan Dana said the company plans a major release of the controversial film chronicling the life and 1982 drug overdose death of actor John Belushi.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 1994 | JAMES BATES
In Walt Disney's new version of "The Jungle Book," opening Christmas Day, actor John Cleese as Dr. Plumford leads Jason Scott Lee as Mowgli into a ballroom. There he shows him the finest wine and food of England, describing it as "all the bare necessities of life." It's a subtle Disney inside joke, referring to the best-known song from the studio's 1967 "Jungle Book" animated hit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
B elushi bolts upright in bed, his heroin-wracked body convulsing. Finally, the coughing subsides. "Scared . . . you, didn't I?," he laughs caustically. . . . "The drugs, John--why?" asks Woodward. "Maybe they're part of some CIA experiment. Ever think of that? . . . Maybe I gave my life for my country--huh? . . . You could write that, Woodward. People would believe it, coming from you--but noooooo! You gotta write all this negative (stuff)!" Belushi starts to shiver. .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
A newly recapitalized Atlantic Entertainment Group has agreed to distribute the controversial film "Wired" this summer to 600-800 American theaters. (The announcement was made late Wednesday and was included in some editions of Thursday's Calendar.) The agreement came four weeks after plans to distribute "Wired" were dropped by New Visions Pictures, allegedly because of pressure from Creative Artists Agency. Both CAA and New Visions officials denied these reports. Atlantic President Jonathan Dana said the company plans a major release of the controversial film chronicling the life and 1982 drug overdose death of actor John Belushi.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1994 | JAMES BATES
In Walt Disney's new version of "The Jungle Book," opening Christmas Day, actor John Cleese as Dr. Plumford leads Jason Scott Lee as Mowgli into a ballroom. There he shows him the finest wine and food of England, describing it as "all the bare necessities of life." It's a subtle Disney inside joke, referring to the best-known song from the studio's 1967 "Jungle Book" animated hit.
NEWS
January 29, 1989
David Bombyk, 36, president of Geffen Film Co., who was only 19 when he began his film career in Warner Bros.' story department. He became story editor for Kings Road Productions in Los Angeles, then joined Edward S. Feldman Productions as head of creative affairs in 1982. In 1984, he co-produced "Witness" and "Explorers" with Feldman. The next year, he produced the action thriller "The Hitchhiker."
BUSINESS
April 28, 1995
Lynn Heide was named vice president of business development and operations for the worldwide pay television division of Paramount Pictures' Motion Picture Group. Heide's tasks include exploring ways to expand Paramount's pay TV operations through venture and licensing deals. * Hanna-Barbera Cartoons Inc. said it will open an international office in London by the end of the third quarter. Jed Simmons, recently named executive vice president, will head the office.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The arrival of "My Father, the Hero" (citywide) begs the question: Why does Hollywood persist in remaking French sex comedies? Most of the originals--including "The Tall Blonde Man With One Black Shoe" and "Les Fugitifs," remade as "Three Fugitives"--weren't all that sexy or funny to begin with. And with the exception of "Three Men and a Little Lady," none of these remakes, which also include "The Toy," "Blame It on Rio," "Partners" and "Buddy Buddy," has been a smash hit. Or sexy. Or funny.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1990 | David Pecchia \f7
Edward Scissorhands (Fox). Shooting in Tampa. "Batman" director Tim Burton takes on this cutting story of a young man (Johnny Depp) who has scissors in lieu of hands. The official press summary labels it "a fantastic tale shorn out of ordinary suburbia and dangerous creativity." Executive producer Richard Hashimoto. Producers Burton and Denise Di Novi. Screenwriter Caroline Thompson. Also stars Dianne Wiest. The Five Heartbeats (Five Heartbeats). Shooting in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
B elushi bolts upright in bed, his heroin-wracked body convulsing. Finally, the coughing subsides. "Scared . . . you, didn't I?," he laughs caustically. . . . "The drugs, John--why?" asks Woodward. "Maybe they're part of some CIA experiment. Ever think of that? . . . Maybe I gave my life for my country--huh? . . . You could write that, Woodward. People would believe it, coming from you--but noooooo! You gotta write all this negative (stuff)!" Belushi starts to shiver. .
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN
Andie MacDowell and Mia Farrow are getting high marks for more than their acting skills. Women in particular are taking note of the two leading ladies and their less than perfectly lean bodies. Some cultural observers suggest the appreciation for these rounder figures means the scales are tilting toward change. Not that MacDowell ("Green Card") and Farrow ("Alice") are anywhere near fat.
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