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Edward Teller

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NEWS
January 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Edward Teller, the father of the H-bomb, said he would mark his 80th birthday at work Friday, after a trip to the nation's capital to promote the Star Wars defense system.
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BOOKS
October 6, 2002 | DAVID HOLLOWAY, David Holloway is the author of "The Soviet Union and the Arms Race" and "Stalin and the Bomb." He is the director of the Institute for International Studies at Stanford University.
In "Brotherhood of the Bomb," Gregg Herken has written an immensely readable account of the lives of three physicists who led us into the Nuclear Age. Robert Oppenheimer directed the wartime effort to design and make the atomic bomb at Los Alamos; Ernest Lawrence developed the method that produced the uranium-235 for the Hiroshima bomb; and Edward Teller, the only one of the three still alive, was the chief designer of the hydrogen bomb.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1992
Physicist Edward Teller, perhaps best known as the "father of the hydrogen bomb" and his advocacy of the "Star Wars" space defense program, will talk about technology and peace tonight at UC Irvine. Teller will speak at 7 p.m. in the Physical Sciences Lecture Hall on campus. The lecture, sponsored by the university's Global Peace and Conflict Studies student group, is free for students and $3 for the public.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001 | PRISCILLA JOHNSON McMILLAN, Priscilla Johnson McMillan, an associate of the Davis Center for Russian Studies at Harvard University, is writing a book about Robert Oppenheimer and the development of the H-bomb
When the last word is written about the Cold War, Edward Teller will be seen to have played a larger role in the race for nuclear weapons than any other American scientist. Increasingly, as archives in Russia and the United States have become accessible, it becomes clear that the United States, not the Soviet Union, set the pace. And if the United States drove the pace, it was Teller, more than any other scientist, who drove the United States.
BOOKS
February 11, 1990 | Daniel O. Hirsch, Hirsch, formerly director of the Stevenson Program on Nuclear Policy at the University of California at Santa Cruz, currently is president of the Committee to Bridge the Gap, a Los Angeles-based public-policy organization. He is the author, with William Mathews, of "The H-Bomb: Who Really Gave Away the Secret?" in the January issue of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Few figures in the nuclear era have had a more remarkable impact, be it for good or ill, or been more controversial, and thus worthy of honest appraisal, than Edward Teller. The principal advocate of the development of the H-bomb, a primary opponent of virtually all arms-control agreements and the godfather of "Star Wars," Teller has shaped this era as have few others. His pivotal role in the destruction of J.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001 | PRISCILLA JOHNSON McMILLAN, Priscilla Johnson McMillan, an associate of the Davis Center for Russian Studies at Harvard University, is writing a book about Robert Oppenheimer and the development of the H-bomb
When the last word is written about the Cold War, Edward Teller will be seen to have played a larger role in the race for nuclear weapons than any other American scientist. Increasingly, as archives in Russia and the United States have become accessible, it becomes clear that the United States, not the Soviet Union, set the pace. And if the United States drove the pace, it was Teller, more than any other scientist, who drove the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1992
Believe it or not: When I entered UC Berkeley in 1959, my tuition was $70 and two of my professors were Edward Teller and Louis H.B. Leakey. SUSAN LESLIE SMITH Temple City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1985
Edward Teller to Speak: Edward Teller, credited with the development of the American hydrogen bomb and a proponent of strategic nuclear defense, will speak at UC Irvine April 3. Teller, a UC Berkeley physicist and former director of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, a leading nuclear weapons research center, will be lecturing on the "Strategic Defense Initiative." The talk is the second of a three-part series of examining President Reagan's proposed "Star Wars" defense system.
MAGAZINE
September 11, 1988
The reporting in "The Man Who Blew the Whistle on 'Star Wars' " (by Robert Scheer, July 17)--on the influence of Edward Teller on Reagan and his "advisers" (including Bush)--should alert the Congress and the public to a system that will only enrich the military-industrial complex and add not one ounce to the national defense. WAYNE ROSGEN Anaheim
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1985
"To survive a nuclear war is our duty," says physicist Edward Teller, one of the key developers of the atomic bomb (Times, Nov. 5). He laments that we don't have enough bomb shelters. It isn't very reassuring to hear such a person say we have reason to be afraid of his invention. Edison never voiced any qualms about his inventions. Teller, in effect, is telling us, "Look, you guys. I invented this bad thing that could destroy us all. I'm not sorry about it, but you better be ready to suffer the consequences of my poor judgment."
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | IAN MADER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Now that the world's nuclear powers have agreed to end all peacetime nuclear explosions to protect man and Earth, some critics say man is tossing away chances to move mountains. These scientists envision using controlled explosions to blast out vast underground storage caverns, stimulate oil fields, prevent earthquakes, generate energy and develop an asteroid defense for the planet. The Chinese even have proposed blasting a 12-mile chunk from a mountain range to divert the Yarlung River.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | LEE DYE
In the scores of television documentaries and newspaper and magazine articles flowing out of the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, there has been enough Monday morning quarterbacking to make any coach ill. Some of it is enlightening, and there cannot be too much discussion of an event that altered human history in such a tragic way. But some of it is a little weird.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1992
Believe it or not: When I entered UC Berkeley in 1959, my tuition was $70 and two of my professors were Edward Teller and Louis H.B. Leakey. SUSAN LESLIE SMITH Temple City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
Thermonuclear expert Edward Teller, one of the world's leading scientists, will speak at a World Affairs Council of Ventura County event Monday. In a speech entitled "The 21st Century, Will It Be Different?" Teller will discuss the future of defense systems and policy, his views on the changes needed to secure a safe world, and how the United States can best deal with the Russian nuclear scientific world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1992
Physicist Edward Teller, perhaps best known as the "father of the hydrogen bomb" and his advocacy of the "Star Wars" space defense program, will talk about technology and peace tonight at UC Irvine. Teller will speak at 7 p.m. in the Physical Sciences Lecture Hall on campus. The lecture, sponsored by the university's Global Peace and Conflict Studies student group, is free for students and $3 for the public.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A nuclear weapons scientist who publicly questioned the feasibility of a key part of the Star Wars program is leaving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he once did battle with one of the legendary names in nuclear physics, Edward Teller. Roy Woodruff, 49, former director of Livermore's nuclear weapons program, announced Wednesday that he is moving to the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, where he will become a senior adviser in the arms control and verification program.
BOOKS
March 18, 1990
Daniel O. Hirsch's review of a biography of Edward Teller reveals that old grudges die hard ("Edward Teller: Giant of the Golden Age of Physics" by Stanley Blumberg and Louis G. Panos, Book Review, Feb. 11). Most of the review purports to expose errors in the biography and hectors Teller for refusing to share the credit for the implosion principle for the hydrogen bomb. However, the real reason for the left's harassment of Teller over the years is much more direct: Teller stood against those such as Robert J. Oppenheimer, who opposed development of the "Superbomb."
BOOKS
March 18, 1990
Daniel O. Hirsch's review of a biography of Edward Teller reveals that old grudges die hard ("Edward Teller: Giant of the Golden Age of Physics" by Stanley Blumberg and Louis G. Panos, Book Review, Feb. 11). Most of the review purports to expose errors in the biography and hectors Teller for refusing to share the credit for the implosion principle for the hydrogen bomb. However, the real reason for the left's harassment of Teller over the years is much more direct: Teller stood against those such as Robert J. Oppenheimer, who opposed development of the "Superbomb."
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