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Edward W Elgar

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March 20, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H. Reed, head of the London Symphony, according to Reed's written account of the bedside conversation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H. Reed, head of the London Symphony, according to Reed's written account of the bedside conversation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it morally defensible to ignore the last wishes of a national hero if there is a chance of re-creating a flash of his genius? Listen to the music. But beware: Sour notes echo from the audience. As he lay dying of cancer in 1933, Edward W. Elgar, the great English composer, worried about his unfinished Third Symphony. "Don't let anyone tinker with it. . . . No one could understand," he told his daughter Clarice and friend W.H.
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