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Edward W Said

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NEWS
February 3, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last November, after Rabbi Meir Kahane was killed by an assassin's bullets, Edward Said learned that he too was a marked man. Jewish extremists linked to the militant rabbi issued a "hit list" of 10 victims they claimed would be killed in reprisal. High up on the list sent to police was Said, a Columbia University professor who is the most prominent Palestinian spokesman in America and a respected figure in the Arab world.
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BOOKS
October 26, 2003 | Guy Davenport, Guy Davenport, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Kentucky, is the author, most recently, of "The Death of Picasso."
A library becomes a museum when you read the books. The things to see in a museum have been chosen. People who choose, and can give the reason for their choice, use an ancient Greek word for themselves -- "critic." Critics at their most useful are those who can guide us through a library when we are turning it into a museum by reading the books. They tend to be very special people, these guides to hundreds of books.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Edward W. Said, an influential Columbia University professor of literature whose public role as the West's most eloquent spokesman for the Palestinian cause brought him both condemnation and awe over the past three decades, died at a New York hospital Wednesday after a long battle with chronic leukemia. He was 67. Said was a fascinating, complex figure who sometimes spoke of his two quite separate lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Edward W. Said, an influential Columbia University professor of literature whose public role as the West's most eloquent spokesman for the Palestinian cause brought him both condemnation and awe over the past three decades, died at a New York hospital Wednesday after a long battle with chronic leukemia. He was 67. Said was a fascinating, complex figure who sometimes spoke of his two quite separate lives.
BOOKS
February 28, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
Mansfield Park in Jane Austen's novel represents the virtues of English life: humane order and a gracious material prosperity, temperately enjoyed. Sir Thomas Bertram is the Prospero of this kingdom, and his impoverished niece Fanny Price sparks her way up through distractions and conflicts to be worthy of it. We are gratified and more. Austen did for her four-square theme what Mozart did for the dominant-tonic cadence. Edward W.
BOOKS
October 26, 2003 | Guy Davenport, Guy Davenport, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Kentucky, is the author, most recently, of "The Death of Picasso."
A library becomes a museum when you read the books. The things to see in a museum have been chosen. People who choose, and can give the reason for their choice, use an ancient Greek word for themselves -- "critic." Critics at their most useful are those who can guide us through a library when we are turning it into a museum by reading the books. They tend to be very special people, these guides to hundreds of books.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1986
The third-quarter charge covers plant closings in the company's tobacco operation and a reduction in the goodwill of an office products unit, Chairman Edward W. Whittemore said, adding that the writeoff will reduce earnings for the quarter and the year. In the third quarter last year, the company reported net income of $114 million on sales of $2 billion. Whittemore also announced a 2-for-1 stock split, payable to holders of record Sept.
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Some of America's best-known writers will gather today in Los Angeles and New York to demonstrate their solidarity with British author Salman Rushdie, who has been targeted for assassination by Iran's supreme leader, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. Members of PEN Center USA West and the National Book Critics Circle will read from Rushdie's works, including "The Satanic Verses," during a private reception in Los Angeles. Authors Ray Bradbury, T.
BOOKS
March 17, 1991
I am an avid reader of the Sunday Book Review but I object strongly to your chosen reviewers gratuitously injecting their own political opinions and prejudices in their copy when it has nothing to do with the book under review. The most recent example is that of Edward W. Said's review of Albert Hourani's "A History of the Arab People" (Feb. 17). In it he says, ". . . a very fine book, which appears just when the United States is attempting in effect to destroy Iraq as a modern Arab nation."
BOOKS
February 28, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
Mansfield Park in Jane Austen's novel represents the virtues of English life: humane order and a gracious material prosperity, temperately enjoyed. Sir Thomas Bertram is the Prospero of this kingdom, and his impoverished niece Fanny Price sparks her way up through distractions and conflicts to be worthy of it. We are gratified and more. Austen did for her four-square theme what Mozart did for the dominant-tonic cadence. Edward W.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last November, after Rabbi Meir Kahane was killed by an assassin's bullets, Edward Said learned that he too was a marked man. Jewish extremists linked to the militant rabbi issued a "hit list" of 10 victims they claimed would be killed in reprisal. High up on the list sent to police was Said, a Columbia University professor who is the most prominent Palestinian spokesman in America and a respected figure in the Arab world.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Flywheel Battery Co. Withdraws From Ford Project: Bellevue Wash.-based American Flywheel Systems Inc., which exhibited a much-noticed concept car at the Greater L.A. Auto Show, informed Ford Motor Co. that it is quitting a joint project to build a hybrid flywheel-combustion engine vehicle for the U.S. Department of Energy. Flywheel batteries are devices that store energy in kinetic form, much like a spinning potter's wheel. AFS Chairman Edward W.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Albert Habib Hourani, the Middle East scholar and writer whose "A History of the Arab Peoples" became an international bestseller after the Persian Gulf War, has died. He was 77. Hourani's family said he died Sunday in Oxford, where he had lectured from 1958 to 1980, after what they said was a short illness. Hourani became director in 1958 of Oxford's Middle East Center, where with fellow historian Elizabeth Monroe he developed a unique collection of papers on the modern Middle East.
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