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June 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
The X-47B, the Navy's new experimental drone, caused a stir in the Washington area when residents mistook the sleek, bat-winged robotic jet for a UFO. The drone was strapped to the back of a big rig en route this week to Naval Air Station Patuxent River in southern Maryland from Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert. Along the way motorists snapped photos and took to Twitter to describe their astonishment. Others, according to a Fox station affiliate in Washington, were so perplexed they called police.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
The X-47B, the Navy's new experimental drone, caused a stir in the Washington area when residents mistook the sleek, bat-winged robotic jet for a UFO. The drone was strapped to the back of a big rig en route this week to Naval Air Station Patuxent River in southern Maryland from Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert. Along the way motorists snapped photos and took to Twitter to describe their astonishment. Others, according to a Fox station affiliate in Washington, were so perplexed they called police.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1993
A new commander will take the helm next month at the Edwards Air Force Base Flight Test Center. Brig. Gen. Richard L. Engel will assume Edwards' top post during change-of-command ceremonies June 16 when Maj. Gen. Roy D. Bridges Jr. relinquishes the post. Bridges, who has commanded Edwards since August, 1991, will become director of requirements at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. A base spokesman said a two-year stint as commander is a typical assignment length in the Air Force.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
A massive experimental drone designed by Boeing Co. engineers to fly for up to four days at a time completed its first test flight above the Mojave Desert at Edwards Air Force Base. The drone, called Phantom Eye, and its hydrogen-fueled propulsion system have the potential to vastly expand the reach of military spy craft. The longest that reconnaissance planes can stay in the air now is about 30 hours. In the test flight, which took place Friday, the Phantom Eye circled above Edwards at about 4,080 feet above Edwards for 28 minutes.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The B-2 stealth bomber concluded its sixth test flight by being refueled in the air and landing at Edwards Air Force Base's flight center in the Mojave Desert. The radar-evading flying wing was refueled by an Air Force KC-10, the military's version of the DC-10, before landing, a base spokeswoman said. The four-engine bomber, which minimizes radar detection through its design and use of composite materials, conducted its maiden flight July 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1994
Last month, we said that the growth of Edwards Air Force Base was one of the few economic bright spots to savor in this region. Indeed, Edwards AFB in the Antelope Valley's high desert had actually grown and prospered in the rounds of military base closings to date. Well, we've had a month to savor it. Now, it's about time to start worrying again about the future of the sprawling 300,000-acre base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2010 | Robert J. Lopez
A Lancaster man was found guilty Monday in the 2008 crossbow murder of a retired Edwards Air Force Base employee, authorities said. Curtis Scott, 39, was found guilty of first-degree murder in connection with the March 11, 2008, slaying, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Angel Martinez, 62, was found dead on a Lancaster street with an arrow piercing his chest. His body was spotted by a passerby at 13th Street East and Avenue K. Prosecutors said Scott wanted to prove to his stepdaughter that he was "someone not to be messed with," according to the district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The bat-winged B-2 stealth bomber will make its first public flying appearance Saturday at the annual Edwards Air Force Base Open House and Air Show. The one-day event at the flight test center on the edge of the Mojave Desert is expected to draw 250,000 to 300,000 people. "The big event Saturday is going to be the B-2," said Capt. Bill Gray, coordinator of the flying portion of the air show and open house.
MAGAZINE
January 27, 1991
After reading Margo Kaufman's "The Art of the Deal" (Private Lives, Dec. 2), it is apparent to me that I am not the only lollipop in town. Where does this insane desire to haggle originate? It is a no-win situation when you know that no matter how good a deal you got, your sleazy brother-in-law could have probably done better. A more sobering thought is that the real value of what I am forced to haggle over is even lower than the best deal I can get. So, I wonder if there is anything worth buying left to buy. GINA GLEASON Edwards AFB
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A huge crack in the earth at Edwards Air Force Base that two years ago forced the temporary closure of a dry lake bed runway is healing, thanks to two wet winters that have filled the normally dry lake and washed soil and silt into the opening. The crack, situated on the southeast end of Rogers Dry Lake only about five miles from another runway used by space shuttles, was discovered in January, 1991.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2010 | Robert J. Lopez
A Lancaster man was found guilty Monday in the 2008 crossbow murder of a retired Edwards Air Force Base employee, authorities said. Curtis Scott, 39, was found guilty of first-degree murder in connection with the March 11, 2008, slaying, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Angel Martinez, 62, was found dead on a Lancaster street with an arrow piercing his chest. His body was spotted by a passerby at 13th Street East and Avenue K. Prosecutors said Scott wanted to prove to his stepdaughter that he was "someone not to be messed with," according to the district attorney's office.
SPORTS
December 29, 2001
Mr. Penner never lets facts get in the way of a cheap shot. The preview on the Humanitarian Bowl [Dec. 25] is a prime example. Fact. The Atlantic Coast Conference subsidizes its bowl-bound teams to make up anything short of a million-dollar payout. Fact. Clemson fans are passionate, loyal, and love to travel to see the Tigers play. Ask any bowl committee in the country which team would they rather have--UCLA or Clemson. I would tend to believe that UCLA chose not to go to Boise as to not be nationally embarrassed by their poor play and poor road following.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Air Force F-16 crashed Tuesday in remote mountains near the California-Nevada border, killing the pilot and a freelance photographer hired to document another plane's test flight, military officials said. The plane went down about 7 a.m. after taking off from Edwards Air Force Base, where the pilot was stationed. Wreckage was found about 30 miles east of the China Lake Naval Air Warfare Center and south of Death Valley in northern San Bernardino County. Maj.
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An apparent grudge between two airmen led to the first multiple slaying in the history of one of the nation's most storied air bases Saturday, leaving three men dead, including a military police officer. A gunman killed the MP and a fellow senior airman before shooting himself once in the head with a 9-millimeter Glock pistol in his military dormitory, Air Force officials said. Dead are Tech. Sgt. Robert B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thunderous sonic boom of a space shuttle coming in for a landing can wake people from a deep sleep. But for Ken Pilkington, it is the starting gun for a five-day work marathon. "When that sonic boom goes off, I get goose bumps," said the mechanic, who works at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base. Every arrival of Discovery, Endeavour, Columbia or Atlantis converts Dryden's sleepy shuttle operations center, Area A, into a boom town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pioneer test pilot Chuck Yeager will break the sound barrier in an F-16, and the B-2 Stealth bomber will make a rare public flight Saturday during the annual open house and air show at Edwards Air Force Base. More than 200,000 visitors are expected to flock to the normally restricted High Desert base, home of a renowned training school for Air Force test pilots and the proving ground for high-tech military planes.
SPORTS
December 29, 2001
Mr. Penner never lets facts get in the way of a cheap shot. The preview on the Humanitarian Bowl [Dec. 25] is a prime example. Fact. The Atlantic Coast Conference subsidizes its bowl-bound teams to make up anything short of a million-dollar payout. Fact. Clemson fans are passionate, loyal, and love to travel to see the Tigers play. Ask any bowl committee in the country which team would they rather have--UCLA or Clemson. I would tend to believe that UCLA chose not to go to Boise as to not be nationally embarrassed by their poor play and poor road following.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993
The Rev. Robert L. Morley ("On Rock 'n' Roll and Gays in the Military," Sermon, Voices, March 15) has rightly pointed out that the issue of homosexuality has largely been a matter of the heart rather than a matter of the head in our society. But instead of trying to inject some reason into the debate, he advocates keeping the debate on its current emotional level, stating: "You lead with your heart." How can we hope to have a better society by asking our citizens to check their brains at the door before they decide the policies that will guide our nation?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1994
Last month, we said that the growth of Edwards Air Force Base was one of the few economic bright spots to savor in this region. Indeed, Edwards AFB in the Antelope Valley's high desert had actually grown and prospered in the rounds of military base closings to date. Well, we've had a month to savor it. Now, it's about time to start worrying again about the future of the sprawling 300,000-acre base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994
U.S. military base closings were inevitable after the bipolar military standoff with the old Soviet Union came to an end. Few, however, anticipated the extent of the hit that our state would take in these matters, especially after our voters had helped elect the current administration in Washington. A federal commission called for the jettisoning of 35 bases nationwide, but a staggering 20% of them were right here in California. It served notice of another monumental blow to the state's economy.
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