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Edwin Correa

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February 13, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE
The Dodgers added another comeback player to their spring training picture Monday when they signed Edwin Correa, a former Texas Ranger top rookie pitcher, to a minor-league contract. Because of problems resulting from a stress fracture in his right shoulder, Correa has not pitched in more than two years, and, as a Seventh Day Adventist, does not pitch from sundown Friday until sundown Saturday, the period his church regards as the Sabbath.
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February 26, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Ramser Correa's religion has cost him friends. It has cost him $250,000. And, now it may cost him his lifelong dream of pitching in the major leagues. Correa, a Dodger pitcher, also is a Seventh Day Adventist. His religion mandates that he stay home and pray from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. It already has caused him to miss two days of practice. "If it comes down to my religion or making the major leagues," Correa said, "the major leagues will have to go.
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SPORTS
February 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Texas Rangers pitcher Edwin Correa says his desire to stay with the team may waver if he is not allowed to observe his religion's Sabbath. Ranger Manager Bobby Valentine excused Correa, a Seventh Day Adventist, from 5 p.m. Friday to 5 p.m. Saturday last season in respect for the pitcher's religious beliefs. But Valentine may ask Correa to agree to a compromise in the arrangement during the 1988 season, his third in professional baseball.
SPORTS
February 13, 1990 | BILL PLASCHKE
The Dodgers added another comeback player to their spring training picture Monday when they signed Edwin Correa, a former Texas Ranger top rookie pitcher, to a minor-league contract. Because of problems resulting from a stress fracture in his right shoulder, Correa has not pitched in more than two years, and, as a Seventh Day Adventist, does not pitch from sundown Friday until sundown Saturday, the period his church regards as the Sabbath.
SPORTS
February 10, 1988 | Associated Press
The Texas Rangers have agreed to let pitcher Edwin Correa rest on his Sabbath, but the team said he may be pressed into service in a pinch. "I respect his position," said Ranger Manager Bobby Valentine. "He respects our position. We're going to do everything we can to make it work." The Rangers agreed to try to keep the pitcher off duty from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, and Correa, a Seventh Day Adventist, said he would help out when necessary.
SPORTS
February 26, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
Ramser Correa's religion has cost him friends. It has cost him $250,000. And, now it may cost him his lifelong dream of pitching in the major leagues. Correa, a Dodger pitcher, also is a Seventh Day Adventist. His religion mandates that he stay home and pray from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. It already has caused him to miss two days of practice. "If it comes down to my religion or making the major leagues," Correa said, "the major leagues will have to go.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | ROSS NEWHAN
The Toronto Blue Jays will move into the Skydome in 1989. There were 12,879 entries submitted in the name contest. Among the losers: Dome Perignon; Pierre Trudome; Dome Kopf; Con Dome; Meet-Ball Dome; Home-T Dome T. The Cincinnati Reds' Ron Robinson, San Francisco Giants' Jeff Robinson and Pittsburgh Pirates' Don Robinson were a combined 6-2 with 16 saves through Saturday, having allowed only 24 earned runs in 83 innings.
SPORTS
February 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Caught in lockout limbo, Bob Ojeda and other major leaguers today have a new set of concerns. Like when to play, where and with what. "We can't even come here," Ojeda said at the New York Mets' spring training camp Wednesday, a day before the owners' lockout went into effect. "The players' union isn't saying don't work out. But I don't think they think it's best for the whole team to get together."
SPORTS
May 15, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The New York Yankees caught up with Edwin Correa and passed the Milwaukee Brewers. Don Mattingly hit his first career grand slam, and Rickey Henderson and Claudell Washington also hit homers, helping the Yankees score a 9-1 victory over the Texas Rangers Thursday at New York. The win moved the Yankees into first place in the East, a half-game ahead of Milwaukee. Correa (1-4) held New York hitless for 7 innings on the way to a 3-1 victory April 28 at Arlington, Tex.
SPORTS
June 8, 1986 | United Press International
Edwin Correa is one of the hottest young prospects in major league baseball this season and definitely is the youngest hot prospect around. Correa, the Texas Rangers rookie starting pitcher, is the youngest player in the majors. His 20th birthday was April 29. "I hope he's pitching for us when he's 21," joked Texas manager Bobby Valentine, mindful of the truism that 21 is the age when most prospects really begin to blossom.
SPORTS
February 10, 1988 | Associated Press
The Texas Rangers have agreed to let pitcher Edwin Correa rest on his Sabbath, but the team said he may be pressed into service in a pinch. "I respect his position," said Ranger Manager Bobby Valentine. "He respects our position. We're going to do everything we can to make it work." The Rangers agreed to try to keep the pitcher off duty from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, and Correa, a Seventh Day Adventist, said he would help out when necessary.
SPORTS
February 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Texas Rangers pitcher Edwin Correa says his desire to stay with the team may waver if he is not allowed to observe his religion's Sabbath. Ranger Manager Bobby Valentine excused Correa, a Seventh Day Adventist, from 5 p.m. Friday to 5 p.m. Saturday last season in respect for the pitcher's religious beliefs. But Valentine may ask Correa to agree to a compromise in the arrangement during the 1988 season, his third in professional baseball.
SPORTS
February 11, 2008 | Kevin Baxter, Times Staff Writer
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- Enter Eduardo Figueroa's Mexican restaurant in Old San Juan and the first thing you notice are New York Yankees pinstripes, the ones the former 20-game winner wore during his eight-year big league career, encased in glass as if they were pages from the Magna Carta. And come to think of it, they might as well be.
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