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Edwin Newman

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BUSINESS
September 24, 1995
In the Sunday Forum commentary, "Cutting Government Programs to Save Energy Overlooks Benefits" (Sept. 10), not one word is said about renewable energy, which alone can solve our energy difficulties that inevitably must grow with time. Is it because if the Department of Energy does come up with an economical solution they will all be out of a job? EDWIN NEWMAN Northridge
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Edwin Newman, known to several generations of television viewers as the dry-witted NBC reporter and commentator who covered coronations and assassinations and wrote two bestselling books on Americans' mangling of the English language, has died. He was 91. Newman died Aug. 13 of pneumonia in Oxford, England, where he had lived since 2007, according to family attorney Rupert Mead. He said Newman's wife and daughter delayed the announcement of his death until Wednesday to allow themselves time to mourn privately.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was Edwin Newman, for nearly 35 years at NBC News, reporting live on assassinations and elections and moderating two presidential debates. Here is Edwin Newman, anchoring "Weekly World News," introducing a story about an island tribe that worships Don King. USA cable's new series based on the wild supermarket tabloid might not seem the proper place for a veteran broadcaster, best-selling author and a chevalier of the French Legion of Honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was Edwin Newman, for nearly 35 years at NBC News, reporting live on assassinations and elections and moderating two presidential debates. Here is Edwin Newman, anchoring "Weekly World News," introducing a story about an island tribe that worships Don King. USA cable's new series based on the wild supermarket tabloid might not seem the proper place for a veteran broadcaster, best-selling author and a chevalier of the French Legion of Honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Edwin Newman, known to several generations of television viewers as the dry-witted NBC reporter and commentator who covered coronations and assassinations and wrote two bestselling books on Americans' mangling of the English language, has died. He was 91. Newman died Aug. 13 of pneumonia in Oxford, England, where he had lived since 2007, according to family attorney Rupert Mead. He said Newman's wife and daughter delayed the announcement of his death until Wednesday to allow themselves time to mourn privately.
BOOKS
February 7, 1988 | Alex Ben Block, Journalist Block, who specializes in covering the business of entertainment, is working on a book about the new Fox Broadcasting Co . for St. Martin's Press
Television was first theorized in the 19th Century, and working models were demonstrated as early as the 1920s. It was in 1948, however, that a breakthrough occured that opened the way for the modern broadcasting industry. RCA Corp., which operated the largest radio network at the time, took over New York's Madison Square Garden to demonstrate a new kind of television camera that required only a small amount of light to produce high quality video images.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994
Television journalists Edwin Newman and Linda Ellerbee, actor Edward James Olmos, Superior Court Judge Aviva Bobb and L.A. Times Media Critic David Shaw are among those scheduled to take part in "What Signals Are the Media Sending You?," an Oct. 27 educational forum hosted by Pacific Clinics Diamond Circle and the Caltech Y. Scheduled for 8 p.m. at Caltech's Beckman Auditorium, the forum will focus on "headline hysteria" and how it may affect public policy and fear of violence. Admission is $25.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987
Journalist-commentator Edwin Newman has been signed to serve as the host-narrator of "Television," the eight-part British series that surveys the medium, scheduled to air next year on PBS. The series is derived from a 13-part presentation produced by Granada Television of England. The American version will be pared to eight hours and new American footage will be added. "Television" will be presented in this country by public television stations KCET/Los Angeles and WNET/New York.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | MICHELLE WILLIAMS
Poor Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega. As if these legal problems weren't enough, you have to wonder if he's given any thought to changing his name. Not the Manuel Noriega part, but his first name--as given to him by the press: Panamanian strongman. He's not the first to be tagged this way. After all, there was Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis, heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali, globe-trotting diplomat Henry Kissinger and Marxist President Salvador Allende of Chile.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1995
In the Sunday Forum commentary, "Cutting Government Programs to Save Energy Overlooks Benefits" (Sept. 10), not one word is said about renewable energy, which alone can solve our energy difficulties that inevitably must grow with time. Is it because if the Department of Energy does come up with an economical solution they will all be out of a job? EDWIN NEWMAN Northridge
BOOKS
February 7, 1988 | Alex Ben Block, Journalist Block, who specializes in covering the business of entertainment, is working on a book about the new Fox Broadcasting Co . for St. Martin's Press
Television was first theorized in the 19th Century, and working models were demonstrated as early as the 1920s. It was in 1948, however, that a breakthrough occured that opened the way for the modern broadcasting industry. RCA Corp., which operated the largest radio network at the time, took over New York's Madison Square Garden to demonstrate a new kind of television camera that required only a small amount of light to produce high quality video images.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1989
President Bush will hold a press conference from the Meridian Hotel in Paris Sunday to discuss his trip to Eastern Europe and developments at this weekend's economic summit. ABC, CBS, NBC and CNN will broadcast the question-and-answer session live at 9:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1996 | MACK REED
Only 100 tickets are left for a symposium on the history of presidential debates scheduled Oct. 15 at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley. CNN anchorman Bernard Shaw is to give the opening address, and Washington Post columnist David Broder the closing speech at the daylong conference, which will examine the history of modern presidential debates since Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy squared off on television in 1960.
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