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Edwin O Reischauer

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NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Edwin Oldfather Reischauer, who served as U.S. ambassador to Japan during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, died Saturday of hepatitis. He was 79. Reischauer died at Green Hospital of Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, the clinic said. Ambassador to Japan from 1961 to 1966, Reischauer wrote several books on Japan and on America's relationship with Japan and Asia. Among his books are "The Japanese Today: Change and Continuity," and "Japan: The Story of a Nation."
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NEWS
September 2, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Edwin Oldfather Reischauer, who served as U.S. ambassador to Japan during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, died Saturday of hepatitis. He was 79. Reischauer died at Green Hospital of Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, the clinic said. Ambassador to Japan from 1961 to 1966, Reischauer wrote several books on Japan and on America's relationship with Japan and Asia. Among his books are "The Japanese Today: Change and Continuity," and "Japan: The Story of a Nation."
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BOOKS
August 31, 1986 | Harry H. L. Kitano
Edwin O. Reischauer has lived a rich, diverse life above and beyond the call of duty of most academics. Reischauer comes across as a compassionate, secure and loving man in these pages, written in a low key, modest style. Born and reared in Japan, Reischauer studied at Oberlin (Ohio) and Harvard and in Paris, Japan and China before serving as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army from 1938 to 1945. After World War II, he developed the field of East Asian Studies at Harvard and served as U.S.
BOOKS
January 24, 1988 | ALEX RAKSIN
Besides being one of America's preeminent authorities on Japan, Edwin Reischauer displays a novelist's sensitivity in this thorough overview, managing to explain the paradoxes of Japan without diminishing the sense of mystery.
BOOKS
January 24, 1988 | ALEX RAKSIN
Besides being one of America's preeminent authorities on Japan, Edwin Reischauer displays a novelist's sensitivity in this thorough overview, managing to explain the paradoxes of Japan without diminishing the sense of mystery.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | United Press International
Energy Conversion Devices Inc. said it has agreed to form a joint venture with Canon Inc. of Japan to manufacture solar cells in the United States. United Solar Systems Corp. will be an American company owned 49.98% by Canon and 49.98% by ECD, with the balance held by Edwin O. Reischauer, former U.S. ambassador to Japan. Under the agreement, the new company will manufacture and sell thin-film solar cell products under license from ECD and Canon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Japanese scholars, upset over a coming PBS docudrama that holds Japanese Emperor Hirohito fully responsible for the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, are attempting to block its airing. Barry Chase, PBS' vice president for news and public affirs programs, is upset too. He maintains the 57-minute "Hirohito: Behind the Myth" "does not charge Hirohito with having been responsible, fully or otherwise.
NEWS
September 8, 1985 | United Press International
The United States and Japan should form a joint commission to find ways to reduce the trade deficit between the nations and avert the "dire results" of a trade war, a former U.S. ambassador to Japan said Saturday. "This is the time when something very spectacular must be done to shift the situation. It's time for heroic acts, dramatic acts," said Edwin O. Reischauer, a Harvard University professor emeritus who was ambassador from 1961 to 1966.
OPINION
September 28, 1986
Japan is one of the world's most ethnically homogeneous societies. With its long history of isolation Japan has been immune from the patterns of population mixing that elsewhere have resulted from open borders, immigration and conquest. For well over a thousands years, as the scholar and diplomat Edwin O. Reischauer has noted, "there have been no significant additions of blood to the Japanese race."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1993 | SHEILA K. JOHNSON, Sheila K. Johnson is the author of "The Japanese Through American Eyes" (Stanford University Press, 1988).
Not long ago, Japanese business organizations announced that they planned to establish a 30-billion yen scholarship fund ($271 million at the current rate of exchange) at Harvard University to commemorate the marriage of Harvard graduate Masako Owada and Crown Prince Naruhito. The money would be used, spokesmen said, to promote studies to help bridge social and cultural gaps between Japan and the United States. Harvard itself may be one such bridge between the two countries.
BOOKS
August 31, 1986 | Harry H. L. Kitano
Edwin O. Reischauer has lived a rich, diverse life above and beyond the call of duty of most academics. Reischauer comes across as a compassionate, secure and loving man in these pages, written in a low key, modest style. Born and reared in Japan, Reischauer studied at Oberlin (Ohio) and Harvard and in Paris, Japan and China before serving as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army from 1938 to 1945. After World War II, he developed the field of East Asian Studies at Harvard and served as U.S.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
The "Building of Tomorrow" that Frank Lloyd Wright built 69 years ago has survived the worst of man and nature. But the great architect's legacy may meet its match in Tokyo's land fever. Marked by the horizontal planes and simple wood and mortar of Wright's "Prairie style," the building sits cracked and leaking on a green square of land encroached by high-rises and construction cranes in one of Tokyo's busier sections.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Two long hours into a pretentious and often sophomoric entertainment by the UC San Diego-resident comedic musical duo called (THE), the show finally began to rise above the ordinary--the ordinary lounge act, that is. Here, elements of Oriental mysticism appeared, along with space suits, glitter-snow and 1960s-style lighting effects, props of no great originality but some entertainment value.
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