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BUSINESS
November 28, 2002 | Susan Decker, Bloomberg News
MGM Mirage has agreed to pay more than $1 million to settle a federal lawsuit accusing the casino operator of discriminating against black and Latino job applicants at its Mirage Hotel and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip. A group of black and Latino applicants will get $840,000 in cash compensation, and the rest of the money will pay for new training programs at the Las Vegas-based company, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
October 3, 2002 | Alex Pham
The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed suit against Sega of America Inc. and Spherion Corp., alleging the companies fired 12 Filipino workers because of their national origin. The workers were employed by Spherion, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based temporary employment agency, but worked at Sega's San Francisco offices to test video games, the EEOC said.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2002 | Associated Press
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against lingerie retailer Victoria's Secret saying that a shop in Langhorne, Pa., didn't honor a promise to give a Baptist saleswoman most Sundays off so she could attend church services. The EEOC suit also accused store managers and employees of subjecting the woman, who is black, to racist comments. A spokesman for Limited Brands Inc., the Columbus, Ohio-based parent of Victoria's Secret, declined to comment.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Cox Communications Inc., the fifth-largest U.S. cable television company, is being sued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for allegedly creating a hostile work environment for Latino employees. The lawsuit also charges that Cox retaliated against workers who complained about discrimination, the EEOC said. The agency filed the suit in U.S. District Court in Austin, Texas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2002 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission of "unreasonable and just plain mean-spirited" conduct, a judge has ordered the agency to pay $386,000 to a law firm that it sued unsuccessfully for sexual harassment and discrimination. U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian issued the order earlier this month after dismissing the EEOC's class-action suit against Robert L. Reeves & Associates, an immigration law firm in Pasadena with about 40 employees.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | EILEEN ALT POWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ron Heater was laid off about two years ago. Despite mailing and hand delivering "hundreds and hundreds of resumes," he says, he still hasn't landed a new job. Heater believes his age--he's 49--might be part of the problem. "Most of the time, companies don't even acknowledge my resume was received, or the interviewers are cold and unreceptive," said Heater, a specialist in credit card fraud detection.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Polo Ralph Lauren Corp. sought to promote a "blond hair and blue eyes" image in denying minorities the same pay and job opportunities as whites, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found. The commission ruled that Polo, maker of Polo Sport and Club Monaco clothing, discriminated against two ex-employees, including a Filipino woman hired to develop an affirmative action program.
NEWS
January 16, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal civil rights lawyers can sue employers and win money damages for workers who have suffered discrimination, even when the workers have signed an agreement to arbitrate their disputes with management, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. The 6-3 decision marks a partial reversal of a pro-arbitration ruling handed down a year ago. Its practical effect may be limited, however, since the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Allstate Corp. should pay as much as $2 billion to 6,500 current and former agents who were improperly forced to give up benefits, a suit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission contends. The commission sued Allstate after the second-largest auto insurer refused to "provide appropriate monetary relief" to the agents after they were forced to become independent contractors rather than regular employees with pensions and benefits, a lawyer for the EEOC said.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. agreed to pay $6.8 million and change its hiring practices to settle U.S. government claims that the retailer discriminated against disabled applicants. U.S. District Judge Garland Burrell in Sacramento approved the settlement, which resolves 13 disability-bias suits the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed in 11 states, including California.
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