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HOME & GARDEN
November 16, 2006 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
JUST so you know, F*art stands for Functional Art, according to owners Steve Cindoyan and Karina Macias. "We pronounce it Eff Art," says Macias, who isn't bothered by alternate pronunciations. "Shopping should be fun, not an intimidating chore." After noting a lack of design destinations in their booming Eagle Rock neighborhood and growing tired of trekking to museum stores, the partners opened their doors as "a gift shop for people who gift themselves."
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NATIONAL
April 29, 2007 | Sandy Banks, Times Staff Writer
First Lady Laura Bush had a hard act to follow Saturday when she delivered the commencement speech at Pepperdine University's graduation ceremony. Preceding her was a student speaker -- graduating senior Christine E. Li, an intercultural communication major from Santa Monica -- who cried, and moved parents and fellow grads to tears, as she lauded classmates' "incredible capacity to love."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
For Zac Efron, it appears that one awesome shirtless performance has led right to another, as he accepted his MTV Movie Award half naked on Sunday night.  The actor, who won the trophy for shirtless performance by stripping down in "That Awkward Moment," had promised in March to take off his top for the awards if he beat Chris Hemsworth's hotness in "Thor. " At first, it seemed as if he wasn't going to follow through on his pledge. But with Rita Ora providing a bit of stripping assistance - she came up behind him and ripped open his snap-closure shirt - he eventually delivered.  "If I beat Thor- I'm accepting the award shirtless on stage.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Age: 43 Accomplishments: Founded Lotus Development Corp. Co-founded the to promote free and open communications in the digital world. Education: Bachelor's from Yale College, with interdisciplinary major in cybernetics. Master's in psychology from Beacon College. Interests: Eastern religion, reading, mountain biking on Martha's Vineyard Family: Kapor and his wife, Ellen Poss, a psychiatrist, have a young daughter and son. They live in Brookline, Mass.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little
As the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 nears its time in the congressional spotlight, supporters and detractors alike are fine-tuning their arguments in preparation for another battle over how the Internet will be influenced by federal legislation. The core objective of CISPA is simple: Opening up greater means for communication between private entities and the federal government on issues of cybersecurity and national security. “Today the U.S. government protects itself using classified and unclassified threat information that it identifies from attacks on its networks,” a staffer on the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence said, introducing the legislation on a conference call April 10. “However, the majority of the private sector doesn't get access to this information because the government has no mechanism today for effectively sharing.” The points of contention reside within the details of the bill.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
You've heard all about how banks present a danger to the financial system once they become "too big to fail" (I'm looking at you, JPMorgan Chase). Here's the equivalent question about a much different company: Has Google become too big to trust? To ask the question is to answer it, but in case that's not explicit enough, the answer plainly is yes. It's become impossible to ignore Google's lengthening string of privacy and regulatory missteps. The company has been found by the Federal Communications Commission to have collected and kept emails and Web browsing histories, even passwords, of individuals whose Wi-Fi signals were intercepted by vehicles photographing street scenes for its Street View program.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Anyone who exposes truly sensitive government secrets can be reasonably certain to have his or her identity revealed eventually (see, e.g., Daniel Ellsberg or Bradley Manning). So it made a certain amount of sense for Edward J. Snowden to announce over the weekend that he was the one who blew the whistle on the National Security Agency's classified and extraordinarily broad surveillance program. I mean, why spend sleepless nights worrying about being discovered when it's just a matter of time?
BUSINESS
September 21, 2000 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Words, words, words! That's one thing the Web has plenty of. Occasionally we need help making sense of them. Online dictionaries cover languages, characters and concepts and range from the invaluable to the inane. If you're studying Spanish, or just trying to figure out whether you've been complimented or cursed at, you can click on http://www.spanishdict.com. This dictionary has more than 54,500 entries with thousands of audio pronunciations.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
Genius, grit and greed drove the first raucous decades of high-tech high life. Now, a cyberlaw expert hopes to start up something new in Silicon Valley: a dot-conscience. With a staff of law school students at UC Berkeley, the clinic will examine dot-com cons, electronic eavesdropping, copyright battles and other ethical dilemmas.
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