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Effective Visual Imagery

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BUSINESS
August 21, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a television studio last week, Laguna Hills tax preparer Marilyn Ratliff looked calmly into a camera and spoke frankly about what was ailing America. "The regulations are getting so horrendous that small businesses can't do business; they just fill out paperwork," she said. "It's frustrating, and nobody seems to be listening." With any luck, President Bush or his challenger, Bill Clinton, will hear her out.
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BUSINESS
August 21, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a television studio last week, Laguna Hills tax preparer Marilyn Ratliff looked calmly into a camera and spoke frankly about what was ailing America. "The regulations are getting so horrendous that small businesses can't do business; they just fill out paperwork," she said. "It's frustrating, and nobody seems to be listening." With any luck, President Bush or his challenger, Bill Clinton, will hear her out.
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BUSINESS
July 16, 1992 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is said we're a visual society these days, dependent on television for most of the news and views that shape our beliefs. Doyle Potter has made his living for the last decade helping businesses perfect their visual messages. Now he wants to use his video camera to help small businesses send a message to those who seek to occupy the White House for the next four years. Beginning Aug.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1992 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doyle Potter thought he would uncork a magnum of comment, criticism and complaint with his offer to prepare a professional videotape of Orange County business owners' messages to the presidential candidates. But what seemed a sparkling idea hasn't generated even a split's worth of fizz and ferment. "We must have an awful lot of apathetic people out there," a disappointed Potter said Monday, as Day One of his offer to tape 10-minute messages to George Bush and Bill Clinton drew to a close.
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