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Egberto Gismonti

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Hermeto Pascoal, as iconoclastic with his thoughts as he is with his music, doesn't mince words. Take the lambada. The rotund, white-bearded, albino Brazilian multi-instrumentalist, who shares the bill with Egberto Gismonti at the Wadsworth Theatre tonight, has powerful feelings about the latest musical import from South of the border. "The lambada? Ha! Let me tell you something about that. To me, the lambada is worse than a disease.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Hermeto Pascoal, as iconoclastic with his thoughts as he is with his music, doesn't mince words. Take the lambada. The rotund, white-bearded, albino Brazilian multi-instrumentalist, who shares the bill with Egberto Gismonti at the Wadsworth Theatre tonight, has powerful feelings about the latest musical import from South of the border. "The lambada? Ha! Let me tell you something about that. To me, the lambada is worse than a disease.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
At the start of his performance Sunday at Tamayo Restaurant in East Los Angeles, pianist Otmaro Ruiz made a simple but vitally insightful statement. "Latin music," he said, "is everything between Tijuana and the tip of South America. And it's not all Tito Puente." Ruiz meant no disrespect for the great bandleader, but he was determined to establish a receptive environment for a program of music reaching from the U.S. to Cuba to Venezuela, Brazil and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the program notes for her Piano Spheres recital Tuesday at the Neighborhood Church in Pasadena, Vicki Ray suggested her concert gathered together "music for a summer evening." Maybe so, but imagine a high-energy party with exotic guests from all over the stylistic map, and none of them loafing around the pool. At the center of the program were two attractive, demanding and utterly different world premieres.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
Siblings who perform together sometimes share a natural ability to synchronize with each other. With guitarists Sergio and Odair Assad, two native Brazilian brothers who played Saturday night to a packed Recital Hall at Cal State Northridge, that ability is not only astonishingly evident, but also a tour de force. The duo perform with remarkable agility and speed, often succumbing to overly flashy or showy temptations, but never losing track of tastefulness or effectively emotive interpretation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN
After hearing a concert by the Brazilian classical guitar duo of Sergio and Odair Assad, one is tempted to suggest they should make a few mistakes on purpose. The surface sheen of their virtuosity combined with their impeccable coordination tended to mesmerize the poor listener. A minor flaw here or there would remind everyone of the human effort behind such seamless music making.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1999 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An aura of purity pervaded the Thursday night concert given by the guitar quartet Quaternaglia in the Little Theatre at Cal State Fullerton. The foursome brought a program of music primarily from their homeland Brazil--not one dominated by the transcriptions one might expect, but a concert of pieces intended for this relatively new genre and, at least in the cases of Sergio Assad, Paulo Bellinati and Egberto Gismonti, written by other well-established guitarists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2000 | JOHN HENKEN
If you are going to give a program of character pieces, you'd better bring lots of musical personality to the table. Brazilian guitarists Sergio and Odair Assad did just that Friday night at UCLA's Schoenberg Hall, lavishing abundant resources of imagination and skill on a varied agenda, much of it recycled from the duo's recordings and other recent area performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2001 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though modest in scale, the Latin American Composers Festival at Cal State L.A. was generous in idealistic intent. The three-concert event, performed by members of the Luckman Chamber Ensemble, sought to help redress the flagrant underexposure granted music from the "other" America. Mission accomplished. Saturday night's keynote concert belonged primarily to the festival's guest composers, both duly celebrated if still lesser-known than they should be.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1997 | JOHN HENKEN
Brazilian music, with its confluence of African and native American heritages, jazz and European classical influences, long has been a fertile fusion nexus for guitarists. The vitality of those mingled traditions was proven again Friday at Schoenberg Hall at UCLA by Sergio and Odair Assad, masters of the idiom. The Assad brothers also rank high in the guitar pantheon as masters of the instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Before the samba became the national sound of Brazil, before bossa nova transformed samba into a global music, there was choro. Emerging in the late 19th century as a blending of European melody, harmony and form with the rhythms of Africa, it was a Brazilian manifestation of similar Western melanges such as ragtime, jazz and tango. Although it has been changed in many ways, choro continues to be a vital element in contemporary Brazilian music.
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