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Eggs

NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- California's egg law has emerged as a contentious issue in congressional negotiations over a farm bill. The Humane Society has funded a $100,000 ad campaign to defeat federal legislation that would prevent California from requiring that eggs imported into the state be produced under standards that give hens enough room to spread their wings. The Humane Society Legislative Fund is running online ads in the states of nearly a dozen House-Senate negotiators. The ads do not mention the California law but show an image of a shopper in a grocery store and warn that a "dangerous federal overreach" threatens state laws that protect animals and the food supply.
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SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Trust science on this: Guys are generally not eager to mate with a high-testosterone bearded lady.   But what goes on with other animals that share “male” ornamentation? Do the females pay a heavy price for aping the decoration of their sexual counterparts? If so, why would that trait survive? PHOTOS: Weird sea creatures and strange fish The eastern fence lizard may offer some answers, according to a study published online Tuesday in the journal Biology Letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
"Free Birds" is an odd duck. The animated feature has a nifty premise: time-traveling turkeys, for starters. They're critters on a mission, as one would assume, their goal nothing less than rewriting American culinary history - and the fate of their species - by changing the main course at the first Thanksgiving. Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson and Amy Poehler contribute spirited voice work, and the movie renders the Plymouth Colony in a rich autumn palette. But like the ungainly avian creatures at the center of the herky-jerky adventure, this 'toon seldom gets off the ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
It's hard to say exactly what skills are needed to become an expert at the game of Egg Russian Roulette, but it's safe to say that Edward Norton has them. The actor, who's hosting "Saturday Night Live" this week, stopped by "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon" to talk about the gig, praise fellow guests Pearl Jam and play an infinitely silly game of Egg Russian Roulette. As Norton himself described it, "It's like Willy Wonka meets 'The Deer Hunter' torture. " The game, as introduced by announcer Steve Higgins in an over-the-top silly voice, required Fallon and Norton to select eggs from a standard carton of a dozen and smash them on their heads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The Los Angeles Zoo is trying to raise the population of female Komodo dragons, a giant and endangered lizard, by using a DNA test originally devised to identify the gender of bird eggs. Swelling the female ranks would help close a gender gap in captive dragons in North America, which is home to 71 males, 46 females and six of the giant lizards whose sex remains unknown. It would also move the species closer to a self-sustaining and genetically diverse population, which scientists believe they would reach with 75 males and 75 females.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
FRESNO - A mosquito that can carry dengue and yellow fever has been found in California, prompting intense eradication efforts in the Central Valley and warnings from officials about how to keep the pest from spreading. "It could change the way we live in California, if we don't stop it," said Tim Phillips of the Fresno Mosquito and Vector Control District. "Imagine not feeling safe to sit out in your backyard in the afternoons. " The yellow fever mosquito, or Aedes aegypti - a white polka-dotted bug that bites during the day and can lay its eggs in less than a teaspoon of water - was first detected in June in Madera.
OPINION
October 1, 2013
Re "Dr. Seuss goes to Washington," Opinion, Sept. 27 As a librarian I find it ironic that Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) would choose to read Dr. Seuss' "Green Eggs and Ham" in his faux filibuster against Obamacare. The lesson of the book is that one has to be open to trying new things, as Peter Dreier notes in his Op-Ed article. All of Dr. Seuss' books have a moral. "The Lorax" reminds us that we must all take care of the vulnerable. "The Butter Battle Book" warns us about allowing bullies to flourish.
SCIENCE
September 30, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
A woman in Japan with a medical condition that ought to prevent her from having children has given birth to a healthy baby boy through a cutting-edge fertility treatment called in vitro activation, or IVA. The woman was one of 27 to try the experimental procedure, which was described in a study published online Monday by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Four other women were able to produce eggs after the IVA treatment, and one of them is currently pregnant, according to the PNAS report . The patients in the study have a rare condition called primary ovarian insufficiency , or POI, which causes their ovaries to shut down prematurely and prevents their follicles from producing eggs.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Don Lee and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - A day after his potentially momentous phone conversation with President Obama , Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was met at home Saturday by cheering supporters and some egg-pelting protesters, while a few members of the U.S. Congress offered a cautious, if somewhat muted, assessment of the first such contact between leaders of the two nations since 1979. The reaction reflected the political realities in both countries over signs of a thawing of relations between the United States and Iran after decades of antagonism, most recently over Tehran's nuclear program . "I think you're going to see very strong reactions in the U.S. and Iran," said Jon Wolfsthal, deputy director of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.
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