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OPINION
October 12, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
"That's all right, all of you know who I am," President Obama joked last week when the presidential seal fell off his podium during a speech in Pittsburgh. Even though the incident made headlines for no discernible journalistic reason, it was noteworthy as a succinct example of Obama's arrogance problem. Rather than make a self-deprecating joke, he opted instead to make a self-inflating one, as if to say that the title mattered less than the man. The good news is that it's apparently not racist to call Obama arrogant anymore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Margaret Wappler
Mimi Pond is the cartoonist that time almost forgot. Her credits should've sealed her in the pantheon of coolness forever: She wrote "The Simpsons'" first episode, "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire," as well as episodes of the children's TV show-cum-surrealist theater project "Pee-wee's Playhouse. " In 1982, her cult-classic book, "The Valley Girls' Guide to Life," taught wannabe Vals how to dress in a, like, totally tubular style. She wrote and illustrated four other humorous books on fashion, including 1985's "Shoes Never Lie," which tapped the stiletto obsession long before "Sex and the City," as well as comics for many publications, including this newspaper.
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SPORTS
August 11, 2010 | Chris Erskine
Ego makes the sports world go round. We could either become bitter about that, or mock it. So with mocking in mind, we give you the somewhat annual All-Ego Sports Team, based on a careful study of the boneheads and blunderkinds who have graced us with their over-the-top behavior. As you can see, it's been a very good (or bad) year. First team LeBron James, pro athlete: The captain of this year's All-Ego Team. In an era of tatted-up, trash-talking ballplayers, he sets new standards in icky self-importance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Amy Poehler showed why she and Tina Fey were back again to host the 71st Golden Globe Awards with a simple switch of an “o” and an “a.” “Tam Honks” became an instant Twitter trend after a deliberate slip of the tongue from “Parks and Recreation” actress Poehler. She congratulated Chiwetel Ejiofer and Lupita Nyong'o for their awards nominations without skipping a beat,  but she had some fun with Tom Hanks who received praise for his roles in “Captain Phillips” and “Saving Mr. Banks.” That's when Poehler uttered the possible new nickname for the veteran actor, “Tam Honks.” Golden Globes 2014: Full coverage | Show highlights | Quotes from the stars | Top winners/nominees | Red carpet arrivals | Complete list | Main story | Nominee reactions Hanks took it all in stride with a chuckle and a look of confusion.
MAGAZINE
October 5, 1986
If we follow the logic set out on sea urchins by Gary Karasik in "A Prickly Question" (Aug. 17), it thus would be perfectly all right to slaughter elephants for their ivory and rhinoceroses for their horns. This is one of the best examples of the overinflated and chauvinistic human male ego: Only those that respond directly to his own needs could be regarded as worthy of his approval and, presumably, admiration. Kathleen Sweet Pasadena
SCIENCE
March 22, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
That time you're spending on Facebook may not be wasted productivity, after all. At least, that's what yet another Facebook-based study has found. You may remember Stuart Smiley, the fey self-affirmation addict portrayed on "Saturday Night Live" by now-Sen. Al Franken. He stares into the mirror and declares, "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough and, dog gone it, people like me. " That's what Facebook does, according to a study published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Last month, as they ate lunch outside a fancy London restaurant, world famous art collector Charles Saatchi physically roughed up his wife, the TV chef Nigella Lawson. Unaware that a paparazzo was snapping away , Saatchi squeezed Lawson's windpipe four times and shoved his finger up her nostril. Lawson, teary and fearful, dabbed at her eyes. Saatchi stalked out and got in their car, as she followed, sobbing. Tabloids on both sides of the Atlantic went crazy. "Arti Choke," blared the inimitable New York Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991
What Coppola did when he cast his daughter Sofia in "Godfather III" doesn't qualify as an act of ego. It comes under the heading of child abuse. Sofia Coppola, through no fault of her own, other than trying to please her father, was simply in way over her head. It's hard to understand her father's thinking. In the two previous "Godfathers," his skill as a director seemed to be in guiding each performance, regardless of size, into a shining gem. For him to not recognize how wrong his daughter was for the part goes above and beyond pure nepotism.
SPORTS
March 14, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
Rafael Nadal made his way into the round of 16 at the BNP Paribas Open on Monday with an impressive victory over a qualifier. He looked sharp, healthy and ready as always to make runs at the major titles. However, you don't always see the best of Nadal on the tennis court. Sometimes, that happens in the cafeteria line. The organizers of this long-running event did an interesting thing when they built their 16,100-seat stadium, called it the Indian Wells Tennis Garden, and opened it for play in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1987 | MELVILLE SHAVELSON
The men eat fire Sleep on nails And saw their wives in half. . . . It seems to us there must be easier Ways to get a laugh. . . . --"Road to Morocco," lyrics by Johnny Burke, music by Jimmy Van Heusen There must be easier ways to get a laugh than spending a zillion dollars to make a lighthearted comedy. I happened to like a great deal of "Ishtar."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
How does a man who turned his back on the world of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll in a quest to be closer to God feel about being welcomed into an institution whose very name celebrates the culture of fame? “Even though it's taken time, I've always been an optimist,” said the 65-year-old musician born Steven Georgiou, formerly known as Cat Stevens and who now uses the single name Yusuf. “I was brought up on the view that if you wait patiently till the end of the story, the good people will live happily ever after.
OPINION
September 10, 2013 | Susan Brenneman, Susan Brenneman, deputy Op-Ed editor, served as ballast in several minor sailing races on San Francisco Bay
Larry Ellison, prince of Silicon Valley, is richer than God. But even Ellison can't always get what he wants. In 2010, Ellison's Oracle Team USA won the America's Cup, the 162-year-old yacht race that pits big personalities and big pocketbooks against wind, currents and radical boat design. The victory gave him the right to set the rules for where and how the next cup would unfold. He chose San Francisco Bay as the location, and set specs for the boats: They would be seven-ton catamarans, 72 feet long, with 13-story carbon-fiber fixed "wingsails.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Joe Flint
If recent history is any guide, there may be an exodus of top executives at Turner Broadcasting in the wake of a shake-up there. Time Warner said Wednesday that Phil Kent would step down at the end of the year as chief executive of Turner Broadcasting, the parent of powerful cable networks CNN, TNT, TBS and Cartoon. Replacing Kent is John Martin, currently the chief financial officer of Turner parent Time Warner Inc. Unlike Kent, Martin will not be based at Turner's Atlanta headquarters but instead will remain primarily in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By David Lauter, Los Angeles Times
Political scientist Louis Brownlow once famously lauded Franklin D. Roosevelt's advisors' "passion for anonymity. " Gone are the days. Today's Washington operatives more closely resemble Norma Desmond in "Sunset Blvd. " - characters consumed by their own stardom, however pretend, always "ready for my close-up. " These are the personalities and the city Mark Leibovich describes in "This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral - Plus Plenty of Valet Parking! - in America's Gilded Capital. " "This Town," he writes, is a place where "self-pimping has become the prevailing social and business imperative," where "self becomes fused with brands" and where, quoting the late White House spokesman Tony Snow, "no one takes friendship too personally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Last month, as they ate lunch outside a fancy London restaurant, world famous art collector Charles Saatchi physically roughed up his wife, the TV chef Nigella Lawson. Unaware that a paparazzo was snapping away , Saatchi squeezed Lawson's windpipe four times and shoved his finger up her nostril. Lawson, teary and fearful, dabbed at her eyes. Saatchi stalked out and got in their car, as she followed, sobbing. Tabloids on both sides of the Atlantic went crazy. "Arti Choke," blared the inimitable New York Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Staples Center held a hell of a hip-hop concert Saturday night, one that through nearly four hours delivered some of Southern California's most accomplished rappers both young and older, as well as a singer on the cusp of superstardom. The concert was part of cable station BET's new BET Experience weekend of shows that culminates Sunday evening with its annual music awards, and the stage of the sold-out arena held L.A. MCs Schoolboy Q, Kendrick Lamar and Snoop Dogg, as well as South Bay-born vocalist Miguel.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997 | D. James Romero
The self-made "superstar deejay" puts his New York club kid days behind him and settles into the trance-adelic break beat sound of L.A. His beats are fast, freaky and kinky, while the album's theme holds the whole way through, right down to its mirrored cover. Keoki brings his rare but proper sense of pop to techno: fun, humorous and, of course, easy to dance to. * Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent).
SCIENCE
March 22, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
That time you're spending on Facebook may not be wasted productivity, after all. At least, that's what yet another Facebook-based study has found. You may remember Stuart Smiley, the fey self-affirmation addict portrayed on "Saturday Night Live" by now-Sen. Al Franken. He stares into the mirror and declares, "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough and, dog gone it, people like me. " That's what Facebook does, according to a study published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It's not surprising that the good folks at NBC decided to give a modernized Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde serial a go. Having made their way through vampires, zombies, werewolves and the occasional ghost/T. rex/space invader, network execs and television writers are banging up against the back wall of the monster cupboard these days, and Robert Louis Stevenson's "case study" of a physician who fatally attempts to isolate the good and bad portions of his personality remains a classic, regularly reprised in a variety of ways.
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