Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEgo Trip
IN THE NEWS

Ego Trip

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | Miles Beller
Ken Tanaka's loopy life story has made him a breakout hit on YouTube. His is the cyber tale of a Caucasian, brought up in Japan by an Asian family, who now yearns to reconnect with his American heritage. Via the cagey use of documentary-style video, Tanaka portrays himself as a hapless hero, a sunny, awkward transplant from Japan, weaned on sushi but looking more like Oklahoma than Yokohama. It's all very charming, but there's just one catch: Is it true?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | Miles Beller
Ken Tanaka's loopy life story has made him a breakout hit on YouTube. His is the cyber tale of a Caucasian, brought up in Japan by an Asian family, who now yearns to reconnect with his American heritage. Via the cagey use of documentary-style video, Tanaka portrays himself as a hapless hero, a sunny, awkward transplant from Japan, weaned on sushi but looking more like Oklahoma than Yokohama. It's all very charming, but there's just one catch: Is it true?
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1990
The Anaheim physician who manipulated the time of a baby's birth so that it took place seconds after midnight on New Year's morning--just in time to be featured as "the first baby of the decade" on a TV religious service--proudly boasts about his feat: "I was highly jubilant. The congregation yelled and screamed and applauded," said Dr. Charles Wesley Turner Jr. "I knew that God had a hand in it." Perhaps. But a pair of forceps made a difference, too.
SPORTS
November 29, 2008
Chris Erskine must have been a carpenter in a prior life. He hit the nail on the head time and again in his Nov. 30 story. Finally, someone with the nerve to expose the profane and bombastic Blue Buffoon, Tommy Lasorda. Ken Kell Orange -- Was it a lack of space or inadvertent editing that left T.J. Simers off the All-Ego Sports Team? Jon Komatsu San Diego
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG
Next time you buy a car and register it at the DMV, pause when you get to the box asking if you want a personalized license plate rather than an anonymous number. Pause and think about the environment. Now, I know that most of us are only thinking. "Do I want my plates to say 'NEW-MBA'?" But, beyond that, beyond vanity plates themselves, is something altruistic.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | LEE DEMBART
Natural Obsessions: The Search for the Oncogene by Natalie Angier (Houghton Mifflin: $19.95; 375 pages) Sometimes at the movies it seems that you have to sit through several minutes of credits--a Such-and-Such production of a So-and-So film, and so forth--before you get to the title. The names of the people and their placement in the pecking order sometimes seem to get more attention than the picture that follows. This concern about massaging people's egos is hardly unique to the movie business.
OPINION
October 15, 2006 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ, GREGORY RODRIGUEZ is an Irvine senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
THERE'S ONLY ONE thing worse than having to listen to canned political speeches and pretentious dignitary-speak. It's having to listen to them back-to-back in English and in Mandarin. Accompanied by a coterie of business, labor and political allies, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is barnstorming through Asia as if it were Iowa before the caucuses and he were running for president. The trip is officially a trade mission, and it appears there are some real business connections and deals being made.
OPINION
June 28, 2005 | Jonathan Coe, Jonathan Coe is the author of seven novels and three biographies. His new novel, "The Closed Circle," was just published by Knopf and his biography of B.S. Johnson, "Like a Fiery Elephant," is recently out from Continuum International.
What on Earth could make a novelist turn to biography? There are years of research to be carried out, hours of interview tapes to be transcribed, and at the end of it, your own authorial personality has to be ruthlessly subsumed to your subject's: the precise opposite of the novel's glorious ego trip, where the writer can be absolute master of his own domain and there is no need to be faithful to those tiresome things called facts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1990 | GRETA BEIGEL
Seated at the concertmaster's chair, music director Iona Brown is putting the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra through its paces in Tchaikovsky's "Rococo" Variations. Picking up her violin, she joins the strings in a passionate pizzicato, before raising her bow to admonish the nearby winds. Later, she cradles her instrument while sculpting a gentle phrase with a free hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1998
If there were ever an "ego trip," it is John Glenn going into space (Jan. 16). HOWARD LOCKWOOD Lake View Terrace
OPINION
August 6, 2008
Los Angeles County voters, fed up with soaring gas prices, pollution and gridlocked traffic, might be asked in November whether they're willing to tax themselves to improve matters. But ego conflicts and parochialism among local politicians could prevent them from ever getting the chance to decide.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2007 | Baz Dreisinger, Special to The Times
For hip-hop fans who relish a good debate, the last few weeks have been a gift horse. On Sept. 25, hip-hop went to Washington. At a congressional hearing titled "From Imus to Industry: The Business of Stereotypes and Degradation," spearheaded by Rep. (and former Black Panther) Bobby L. Rush (D-Ill.), speakers included Viacom Chief Executive Philippe Dauman, Warner Music Group CEO Edgar Bronfman Jr. and rappers Master P and David Banner.
WORLD
June 9, 2007 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
THERE'S not a lot to do when you're a closely watched visitor in North Korea except hit the karaoke at day's end, so we're at it again. From the sound of it, most North Korean karaoke falls into two categories. Soupy ballads about national glory, superior leadership, glorious workers. And hard-driving martial tunes urging citizens to think as one and pick up a bayonet. Rounding out the experience are video clips of goose-stepping soldiers and ozone-piercing missiles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2007 | Larry Gordon and Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writers
No wonder YouTube is so popular. All the effort to boost children's self-esteem may have backfired and produced a generation of college students who are more narcissistic than their Gen X predecessors, according to a new study led by a San Diego State University psychologist. And the Internet, with all its MySpace and YouTube braggadocio, is letting that self-regard blossom even more, said the analysis, titled "Egos Inflating Over Time."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2006 | Dana Parsons
The temptations must be great. You've got the robe, the gavel, the highest perch in the room. You look down on everyone. What you say goes. You can see how a judge might feel omnipotent. But if anybody should resist temptation, it's our judges. They have way too much power to behave like the rest of us might. "These are ordinary people, and they're asked to do something extraordinary," says David Rothman, a retired Los Angeles Superior Court judge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2006 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
For $75 million, you could buy the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim hockey team, a Boeing 737 or 20 million large cafe mochas at Starbucks. Or you could snap up the country's most expensive home for sale outside of the East Coast -- a 30,000-square-foot mansion perched on a cliff in Corona del Mar. "This is a destination resort hotel on a small scale," said Newport Beach architect Brion Jeannette, who designed the two-story home that spreads across three lots.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1992
The article, "Prudent Spender Has 1,298 Credit Cards--and Counting" (March 31), about the fellow who collects credit cards, publicizes a useless and wasteful "achievement." It has no social or economic benefit except an ego trip for the collector. It increases the cost of doing business and such increases are passed along to the rest of us. ROBERT S. GREENBERG Granada Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2006 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
For $75 million, you could buy the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim hockey team, a Boeing 737 or 20 million large cafe mochas at Starbucks. Or you could snap up the country's most expensive home for sale outside of the East Coast -- a 30,000-square-foot mansion perched on a cliff in Corona del Mar. "This is a destination resort hotel on a small scale," said Newport Beach architect Brion Jeannette, who designed the two-story home that spreads across three lots.
OPINION
June 28, 2005 | Jonathan Coe, Jonathan Coe is the author of seven novels and three biographies. His new novel, "The Closed Circle," was just published by Knopf and his biography of B.S. Johnson, "Like a Fiery Elephant," is recently out from Continuum International.
What on Earth could make a novelist turn to biography? There are years of research to be carried out, hours of interview tapes to be transcribed, and at the end of it, your own authorial personality has to be ruthlessly subsumed to your subject's: the precise opposite of the novel's glorious ego trip, where the writer can be absolute master of his own domain and there is no need to be faithful to those tiresome things called facts.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|