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Egypt Foreign Policy

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NEWS
January 21, 1991 | Reuters
Muslim fundamentalists Sunday urged Egypt, a key member in the U.S.-led anti-Iraq alliance, to withdraw from the coalition which they said had attacked a Muslim nation in "a barbarian, destructive" way. The Muslim Brotherhood said the reason for which troops were sent--to defend Saudi Arabia and other gulf states against possible Iraqi aggression--is no longer valid.
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WORLD
June 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's foreign policy under its first Islamist president is likely to change in tenor but not substance, at least in the short term, as the new government can ill afford to strain relations with the U.S. or risk international furor by abandoning Egypt's 1979 peace treaty with Israel. President Mohamed Morsi faces domestic social and financial crises that are expected to eclipse foreign affairs in coming months. Rhetoric against Jerusalem and Washington may sharpen, but Morsi, who ran as the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate, is desperate for Western and regional investment to ease the economic turmoil that has overwhelmed the Arab world's most populous state.
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WORLD
June 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's foreign policy under its first Islamist president is likely to change in tenor but not substance, at least in the short term, as the new government can ill afford to strain relations with the U.S. or risk international furor by abandoning Egypt's 1979 peace treaty with Israel. President Mohamed Morsi faces domestic social and financial crises that are expected to eclipse foreign affairs in coming months. Rhetoric against Jerusalem and Washington may sharpen, but Morsi, who ran as the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate, is desperate for Western and regional investment to ease the economic turmoil that has overwhelmed the Arab world's most populous state.
WORLD
May 8, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Egypt's new government has embarked on adventurous diplomacy to replace the legacy of former President Hosni Mubarak with a bolder Middle East presence less compliant with the U.S. and Israel. Cairo's maneuvers to reshape foreign policy include improved relations with the militant group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, and its decision to ignore Israeli objections and reopen the Rafah border crossing after years of blockade to stop weapons smuggling into the Palestinian enclave.
WORLD
May 8, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Egypt's new government has embarked on adventurous diplomacy to replace the legacy of former President Hosni Mubarak with a bolder Middle East presence less compliant with the U.S. and Israel. Cairo's maneuvers to reshape foreign policy include improved relations with the militant group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, and its decision to ignore Israeli objections and reopen the Rafah border crossing after years of blockade to stop weapons smuggling into the Palestinian enclave.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2001 | NADIA ABOU EL-MAGD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Egypt's most popular television commentator, Hamdi Qandil, called for a boycott of U.S. goods, which his government opposes, it got past the censor. But he was stopped from repeating it. The first time he said on his program "Editor-in-Chief" that Americans were dropping food to Afghans so that they could "fatten them up before they slaughter them," it was cut, but he slipped it in the following week. "We are playing a cat-and-mouse game.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | Matthew Cooper
Click here to download TV listings for the week of July 29 - Aug. 4 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   SATURDAY CBS This Morning (N) 5 a.m. KCBS Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer Osama bin Laden, national security: Admiral William McRaven, commander, U.S. Special Operations. 3 p.m. CNN McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY The Chris Matthews Show President Obama's reelection chances; will Hillary Clinton run for president in 2016?
OPINION
August 24, 2012 | By David Schenker and Christina Lin
Next week, Egypt's Islamist president, Mohamed Morsi, will visit China at the invitation of President Hu Jintao. He will seek investments there that will enable Egypt to "dispense of loans and aid," according to Morsi's party vice chairman. From China, Morsi will travel to Tehran to attend the Non-Aligned Movement summit. Just two months after coming to power, Morsi is pursuing a rapprochement with Tehran and articulating a newfound ambition to jettison billions in U.S. foreign assistance dollars and financing from Western financial institutions.
WORLD
August 12, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi on Sunday purged the nation's military leadership in a provocative move to expand his power and push aside generals who epitomized the inner circle of deposed leader Hosni Mubarak. The dismissals, including the forced retirement of Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, who led the military council that had ruled for more than a year, stunned a nation engulfed in months of political turmoil. The president also scrapped a constitutional declaration by the generals that had dramatically constrained his authority.
WORLD
February 5, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad arrived to a red-carpet welcome and a kiss on the cheek by Egypt's new Islamist leader in a historic trip to strengthen relations between the two nations after decades of estrangement and suspicion. Iran seeks a closer bond with Cairo as part of a strategy to broaden its influence in the Middle East at a time when Tehran's closest ally, Syria, is enmeshed in a civil war and Ahmadinejad faces increasing pressure from Arab states in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | Reuters
Muslim fundamentalists Sunday urged Egypt, a key member in the U.S.-led anti-Iraq alliance, to withdraw from the coalition which they said had attacked a Muslim nation in "a barbarian, destructive" way. The Muslim Brotherhood said the reason for which troops were sent--to defend Saudi Arabia and other gulf states against possible Iraqi aggression--is no longer valid.
NEWS
August 3, 1985 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
To hear the Egyptian press tell it, President Hosni Mubarak's presence galvanized the Arab and African leaders who gathered in Addis Ababa for the recent 21st summit meeting of the Organization of African Unity. "Africa's benefit from the Egyptian presence was considerable," the semi-official newspaper Al Akhbar boasted. "For the first time in years, problems and differences failed to impede an African summit.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The peaceful stretch of Atlantic Avenue is dotted with small markets selling spices, baklava and imported goods to women whose heads are covered by scarves and to men in white robes. They cross paths with more typical urban passersby. It scarcely seems a gathering place for terrorists. Yet the trail of evidence in the World Trade Center blast and an alleged plot to unleash a second wave of bombings in New York can be traced to two graffiti-stained buildings on this block in Brooklyn.
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