Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEgypt History
IN THE NEWS

Egypt History

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The recent discovery of the remains of a 4,500-year-old bakery on the Giza Plateau may be a key element in determining the sociopolitical structure of Egypt in the 27th Century BC. The bakery, along with a massive wall that cordoned off part of the site, suggests further that Egypt's rulers also lived there for much of the year. This gives the scientists hope of finding a palace nearby.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 30, 2011 | By Scott MacLeod
I'd been looking forward to greeting my Egyptian students Sunday, the first day of the spring semester at American University in Cairo. Instead, classes have been canceled and Egypt burns. I am hunkered down in my apartment with the cat. Outside, gunshots ring out through the night. My local supermarket was looted and burned, and our landlord, Tareq, came by Saturday to say that he and other neighbors have barricaded our street and formed a private militia to protect us from the anarchy.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
New evidence that Egypt's Great Sphinx may be twice as old as had been thought has triggered a fierce argument between geologists who say it must be older and archeologists who say such a conclusion contradicts everything they know about ancient Egypt. Geologists who presented their results at the Geological Society of America convention here Tuesday said that weathering patterns on the monument are characteristic of a period far older than had been believed.
BOOKS
April 21, 2002 | BRIAN FAGAN, Brian Fagan is the author of numerous books, including "The Rape of the Nile: Tomb Robbers, Tourists, and Archaeologists in Egypt." His most recent book is "The Little Ice Age: How Climate Made History 1300-1850." He is a professor of anthropology at UC Santa Barbara.
The grand sweep of ancient Egyptian civilization encompasses 3,000 magnificent years. The Egyptians themselves were well aware of the antiquity of their civilization. Egyptian priests at Naukratis in Lower Egypt chided the Greek sage Solon when he talked history with them in 530 BC. "You Hellenes," they tartly reminded him, "are but children," and they were right. Thirty dynasties of pharaohs span these 3,000 years, achieving three apogees of magnificence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
On a chilly February morning in 1986, archeologists Geoffrey T. Martin and Jacobus van Dijk descended into the underground tomb of Ramose, a minor functionary of Egypt's 18th Dynasty. Their goal was a 60-foot-deep shaft they had discovered a few days before after breaking through a barrier erected by grave robbers perhaps centuries earlier.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along narrow Al Muizz Street, it is difficult to imagine that this tumbledown, trash-strewn lane was, in its day, the most important street of the most opulent city on Earth. Today, it is far from glorious. Lost in the enormous sprawl of Cairo, this 1,000-year-old lane barely 15 feet wide is crowded with polluting aluminum smelters and other small workshops. Cars thread their way through throngs of pedestrians, and squatters hang laundry from dilapidated, earthquake-cracked buildings.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | Reuters
A fleet of royal ships, said to be ancient Egypt's earliest, has been found buried miles from the Nile, a major discovery that will help penetrate the largely unknown world of Egypt's first pharoahs. American and Egyptian archeologists discovered the 12 large wooden boats in September and October at Abydos, an ancient burial ground 280 miles south of Cairo. Experts said the boats--which are 50 to 60 feet long--are about 5,000 years old.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Archeologists have discovered an early Greco-Roman burial ground in western Egypt believed to contain at least 10,000 mummies, the largest such find to date. Researchers in Egypt's Western Desert so far have unearthed 200 mummies, including some of the wealthy and powerful of 3,000 years ago, Egypt's Middle East News Agency reported, quoting Zahi Hawass, head of the 12-member discovery team.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A 3,200-year-old tomb in Egypt that was explored briefly and then sealed last century after scientists concluded that it held little of value is instead turning out to be a window onto the reign of one of the most powerful kings of ancient Egypt, Ramses II, who some scholars believe allowed Moses to flee with the Jews in search of the Promised Land.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Give the ancient Egyptians points for consistency. In America, our artistic movements last a decade or so. Fashions change every 12 minutes. But the ancient Egyptians kept things more or less the same for, oh, about 3,000 years. That's a good way to leave a permanent mark on the world. Ancient Egyptian art is not only a source of historic fascination but also a continuing artistic influence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2001 | MALCOLM JOHNSON, HARTFORD COURANT
Ancient Egypt holds out three magnets for movie makers: its connections to the Bible through Moses and Joseph, the eternal allure of Cleopatra and, above all, the mystery of mummies. It is the last of the trinity that brings forth one of the summer's big sequels, "The Mummy Returns." The grandeurs of early civilizations gripped the minds of filmmakers since the days of the early Italian cinema and the first epic by D.W. Griffith, the 1913 "Judith of Bethulia."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ancient Egypt has cast its spell. The civilization that left its mark three millenniums ago emerges in the present, from Verdi's tale of star-crossed lovers in L.A. Opera's "Aida" and the new Elton John-Tim Rice Broadway musical of the same name, to Disney's animated film "The Prince of Egypt." Weeks ago, freshly unearthed tombs rigged with curses and booby traps from the Valley of the Golden Mummies sparked a giddiness reminiscent of an Indian Jones adventure.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Give the ancient Egyptians points for consistency. In America, our artistic movements last a decade or so. Fashions change every 12 minutes. But the ancient Egyptians kept things more or less the same for, oh, about 3,000 years. That's a good way to leave a permanent mark on the world. Ancient Egyptian art is not only a source of historic fascination but also a continuing artistic influence.
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Archeologists have discovered an early Greco-Roman burial ground in western Egypt believed to contain at least 10,000 mummies, the largest such find to date. Researchers in Egypt's Western Desert so far have unearthed 200 mummies, including some of the wealthy and powerful of 3,000 years ago, Egypt's Middle East News Agency reported, quoting Zahi Hawass, head of the 12-member discovery team.
TRAVEL
May 2, 1999 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
When the novelist Virginia Woolf sought truth about certain problems that plague mankind, she went to the British Museum. So do millions every year, though generally for less elevated reasons. They stream into the sprawling neo-Greek temple in London's primly Victorian Bloomsbury district to see the Magna Carta, the Elgin Marbles and, above all, the mummies. The mummies are the ever-popular centerpiece of the museum's vast Egyptian collection, 100,000 objects strong.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1998 | JESSICA SEIGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Bible says Moses ended his days buried in a place unknown to any man. His supposed nemesis, Pharaoh Ramses II, however, ended up in a glass case at the Cairo Museum. Pinched-looking and a bit tattered, he may be one of the few experts on the Exodus story that DreamWorks executives did not consult for their animated movie, "Prince of Egypt."
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
After 3,200 years, she still looks beautiful. Her shapely figure, delicate features and long black hair, depicted on the walls of her tomb in colors as fresh as if they had been painted yesterday, provide ample evidence of how she came to personify the elegance and sophistication of ancient Egypt.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Moustafa Azzouni recalls when the Egyptian army was entrenched along the front lines of the Suez Canal one day in 1973, but wasn't going much further unless a new battery of rockets was constructed. Desperate, the commander dispatched a young supply captain to order needed concrete and iron bars to install the emplacement. There wasn't much hope. Ordinary requisition orders had a way of crawling to Cairo and disappearing.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along narrow Al Muizz Street, it is difficult to imagine that this tumbledown, trash-strewn lane was, in its day, the most important street of the most opulent city on Earth. Today, it is far from glorious. Lost in the enormous sprawl of Cairo, this 1,000-year-old lane barely 15 feet wide is crowded with polluting aluminum smelters and other small workshops. Cars thread their way through throngs of pedestrians, and squatters hang laundry from dilapidated, earthquake-cracked buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tomb in Egypt's Valley of the Kings called KV5 is thought to be a mausoleum housing the remains of as many as 50 of the sons of Ramses II, one of Egypt's greatest organizers and planners and perhaps the pharaoh of the Exodus. Unearthed in 1994 in a last-chance study of an unimposing tomb before it was covered over by a parking lot for buses, KV5 has proved to be an unprecedented monument to Ramses' progeny and to the toil of countless Egyptian stonemasons.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|