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Egypt Relief

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NEWS
October 16, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. inspectors began Thursday to assess damage from the earthquake that rumbled through Cairo's stately historic districts, home to three-fourths of the world's Islamic monuments and now the troubling scene of leaning minarets and toppled marble.
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WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Egypt eased border restrictions for residents of the Gaza Strip long bottled up by an Israeli-led blockade of the seaside enclave in another potent sign of the changes shaking the status quo across the Middle East — and pressing Gaza's ruling militant group, Hamas, toward moderation. A rare mood of optimism reigned Saturday at the Rafah border crossing into Egypt, where hundreds took advantage of new, relaxed rules they hope will mark the end of the blockade imposed after Hamas seized control of Gaza in 2007.
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NEWS
October 15, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a small but growing tent city around the ancient Mosque of Ibn Talun, hundreds of Egyptians left homeless by this week's earthquake waited Wednesday for handouts of blankets, mattresses, food and cash. Their benefactors: serious-faced young men in beards bearing placards saying, "Islam Is the Solution." A few hours earlier, a government man had come by with a pickup truck full of promises. He pledged free apartments and cash handouts, then drove off in the dust. "How can we find you again?"
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a week after heavy flash floods swept through southern Egypt, new assessments show damage far worse than originally feared, with more than 36,000 homes destroyed or badly damaged, 151 schools collapsed and 20,975 acres of cropland--the livelihood of thousands of Nile Valley peasants--submerged under the killing waters.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a week after heavy flash floods swept through southern Egypt, new assessments show damage far worse than originally feared, with more than 36,000 homes destroyed or badly damaged, 151 schools collapsed and 20,975 acres of cropland--the livelihood of thousands of Nile Valley peasants--submerged under the killing waters.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Egypt eased border restrictions for residents of the Gaza Strip long bottled up by an Israeli-led blockade of the seaside enclave in another potent sign of the changes shaking the status quo across the Middle East — and pressing Gaza's ruling militant group, Hamas, toward moderation. A rare mood of optimism reigned Saturday at the Rafah border crossing into Egypt, where hundreds took advantage of new, relaxed rules they hope will mark the end of the blockade imposed after Hamas seized control of Gaza in 2007.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. inspectors began Thursday to assess damage from the earthquake that rumbled through Cairo's stately historic districts, home to three-fourths of the world's Islamic monuments and now the troubling scene of leaning minarets and toppled marble.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a small but growing tent city around the ancient Mosque of Ibn Talun, hundreds of Egyptians left homeless by this week's earthquake waited Wednesday for handouts of blankets, mattresses, food and cash. Their benefactors: serious-faced young men in beards bearing placards saying, "Islam Is the Solution." A few hours earlier, a government man had come by with a pickup truck full of promises. He pledged free apartments and cash handouts, then drove off in the dust. "How can we find you again?"
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