Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEgyptian Museum
IN THE NEWS

Egyptian Museum

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | Associated Press
A military court sentenced the chief of a mental asylum to life at hard labor Thursday for letting go a patient who went on to kill nine German tourists in a Sept. 18 attack outside the Egyptian Museum. Another doctor, a guard, three nurses and three attendants at the asylum also received sentences of three to 10 years of hard labor. The court found Dr. Naseem Abdel-Mallak, chief of the Khanqa Asylum, guilty of corruption and negligence in allowing patient Saber Farhat to leave the hospital.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012
Jackson brothers to tour Almost three years after the death of Micheal Jackson, his brothers are set to go back on tour. It will be their first tour together in nearly three decades. The Jacksons have announced plans for a summer trek, dubbed the Unity Tour 2012, that will mark the first time Jackie, Jermaine, Marlon and Tito Jackson have toured together since their Victory Tour in 1984. Kicking off June 18 in Louisville, Ky., the 27-date jaunt will include a stop in L.A. July 22 at the Greek Theatre.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
December 8, 2002 | Aline Kazandjian, Aline Kazandjian is a freelance writer based in Cairo.
The Egyptian Museum in Cairo will display some of its finest treasures for the first time in celebration of its centennial, beginning Monday. King Tutankhamen is expected to steal the show. The yearlong "Hidden Treasures" exhibit will include funerary boats and golden items from the young pharaoh's tomb. A black granite statue of the goddess Isis, a gold dish and a golden earring discovered in underwater excavations in Alexandria will reflect the Greco-Roman period in Egypt's history.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Zahi Hawass, the best friend an ancient despot ever had, came to Southern California this week with a message for Americans who've been watching the land of the Pharaohs with amazement and concern: Post-revolutionary Egypt is safe, secure and tourist-friendly — so come on down! The famously telegenic Egyptian antiquities minister rose to prominence during the autocratic reign of Hosni Mubarak and had rough going during and after the 18 days of people-power protests that led to Mubarak's resignation four months ago, ending his 30 years of police-state rule.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | DONNA BRYSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Papyrus records show Ramses III's foreman professed innocence when he was accused of stealing a chest belonging to the pharaoh. Some 3,000 years later, archeologists uncovered evidence of his guilt--the gold-plated box was buried under the foreman's home. The tale is itself evidence, say national museum curators who have worked with police to assemble a new exhibit tracing the loss and recovery of ancient treasures. The Ramses chest proves Egyptian art has had a powerful allure for generations.
NEWS
March 17, 1994
The Getty Conservation Institute's innovative design of a case for maintaining mummies and other fragile organic materials was used as a model recently by an Egyptian museum to restore the Royal Mummies to public view. The case sustains an environment that stems the erosion of mummies by preventing microbiological activity.
OPINION
June 25, 2005
Re "In Defense of King Tut," Commentary, June 20: Thomas Hoving talks about going into the Egyptian Museum in 1975 after-hours, alone, and given permission to open any case, even kissing Tut's gold mask. Zahi Hawass, Egypt's chief of antiquities, wants Egyptian treasures in foreign museums to be returned to Egypt. Where were the alarms when the case was opened so that Hoving could kiss the mask? Where were the security guards who should have accompanied him? Has security gotten any better at the Egyptian Museum today?
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Security officials took four mental health officials and workers into custody for allegedly taking bribes and aiding the escape of a man who, along with his brother, allegedly attacked a tour bus at the Egyptian Museum, killing 10. Police said they arrested the head of the country's mental health institutions, the administrator of the Khanqa Asylum, where alleged attacker Saber abu Ulla was a resident, and two orderlies. Abu Ulla escaped from Khanqa three days before the attack, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Council of Antiquities for Egypt has given the St. Louis Art Museum a May 15 deadline to turn over the 3,000-year-old burial mask of Ka Nefer Nefer, which they believe left the country illegally. Officials at the museum in St. Louis are evaluating documents from the council that seek to prove that the mask from around 1307 to 1196 BC could have been stolen from an Egyptian Museum storage room. "We don't feel like we've seen everything yet," said Brent Benjamin, director of the St.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
A 3,300-year-old bust of the Egyptian queen Nefertiti went on view Tuesday at a new, temporary home in Berlin as the centerpiece of a special five-month exhibition. Nefertiti, one of Berlin's best-known cultural treasures, was put in a padded box late Monday and driven to the Kulturforum complex from the Egyptian Museum, part of the collection's move from former West Berlin to the capital's historic downtown area.
WORLD
February 1, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Egyptians are hoping against hope that forging a new future won't cost them their past. Tumultuous protests sweeping across the country carry the hope of a new government, a thrilling prospect for a beleaguered citizenry. But as looters move to take advantage of the unrest, archaeological experts warn that Egypt's treasure trove of antiquities is in peril. The center of the protest movement, Tahrir Square, abuts the Egyptian Museum, home to thousands of priceless artifacts encompassing centuries of Pharaonic history.
TRAVEL
August 1, 2010
1. The sun, the sea, the near-daily scenes of social unrest. It's no wonder cruise ships and chartered aircraft are circumventing Greece, taking travelers to trendy Turkey and Egypt instead. Greek travel associations said hotel bookings were down for a second straight season, seesawing between a 30% drop in May, when austerity measures sparked rioting, to about 10% in July. Unofficially, the decline is steeper. Struggling hoteliers estimate a 30% drop in stays, forcing many of the country's small-scale hostel owners to close for the season or shed their money-losing digs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Egypt plans to seek the temporary return of some of its most precious artifacts from museums abroad, including the Rosetta Stone and a bust of Nefertiti. The country's chief archeologist, Zahi Hawass, said the Foreign Ministry would send letters this week requesting that the ancient artifacts be loaned to Egypt. Hawass has previously demanded the permanent return of many of the artifacts, claiming some of them were taken illegally.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2007 | Setarreh Massihzadegan, Associated Press
Locks of 3,200-year-old hair from the pharaoh Ramses II were unveiled at the Egyptian Museum on Tuesday, returned to Egypt after being stolen 30 years ago in France and put up for sale on the Internet. The small tufts of brown hair were displayed alongside pieces of linen bandages and 11 pieces of resin used in the mummification of Ramses and his son Merneptah in a glass display case. Photographers mobbed the case as Egypt's culture minister and antiquities chief showed off the returned items.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Council of Antiquities for Egypt has given the St. Louis Art Museum a May 15 deadline to turn over the 3,000-year-old burial mask of Ka Nefer Nefer, which they believe left the country illegally. Officials at the museum in St. Louis are evaluating documents from the council that seek to prove that the mask from around 1307 to 1196 BC could have been stolen from an Egyptian Museum storage room. "We don't feel like we've seen everything yet," said Brent Benjamin, director of the St.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2005 | Hossam Hamalawy, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't exactly what Jonathan and Mary Brown were expecting. The British couple were shocked by their first visit to the old Egyptian Museum, set in the heart of Cairo's busiest downtown square. "It breaks my heart seeing the monuments kept that way," said Jonathan Brown, a retired real estate investor. "I got into the museum and didn't know which way to go. I couldn't find user-friendly maps, no illustrations. It's also very noisy here. I felt I was at a circus, not a museum."
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of tourists poured into the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, undeterred by a fire-bomb attack that killed nine Germans and their driver and raised doubts about the success of the government's crackdown against Islamic rebels. The government moved quickly after the assault to reaffirm that Egypt was safe for tourism, saying the attack on a tourist bus in the museum's parking lot was a "random criminal act."
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed men shouting "God is greater!" firebombed and shot into a crowded tour bus in the heart of this city Thursday, setting off a conflagration and gun battle that killed nine German tourists and their Egyptian driver. It was the worst assault on tourists in Cairo in 17 months.
OPINION
June 25, 2005
Re "In Defense of King Tut," Commentary, June 20: Thomas Hoving talks about going into the Egyptian Museum in 1975 after-hours, alone, and given permission to open any case, even kissing Tut's gold mask. Zahi Hawass, Egypt's chief of antiquities, wants Egyptian treasures in foreign museums to be returned to Egypt. Where were the alarms when the case was opened so that Hoving could kiss the mask? Where were the security guards who should have accompanied him? Has security gotten any better at the Egyptian Museum today?
WORLD
May 1, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Armed militants turned their wrath against foreign tourists Saturday as a pair of attacks rocked two of the Egyptian capital's most famous and popular attractions. All three of the alleged assailants were killed and nine people were wounded in the afternoon violence near the Egyptian Museum and the Citadel.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|