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Egyptian People

WORLD
July 3, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO -- The liberal opposition Constitution Party asked Wednesday for the military's intervention to prevent Egypt "from slipping into civil war," and accused President Mohamed Morsi of "instigating his supporters to battle the sons of the same nation under the pretext of protecting legitimacy, which has already abandoned him. " In a statement, the party, headed by Nobel Peace Prize laureate Mohamed ElBaradei, said Morsi's speech late Tuesday night...
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WORLD
December 22, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - President Mohamed Morsi apparently secured a victory at the polls Saturday for a new Egyptian constitution, locking the country into a bitter contest between his ascendant Islamist camp and his secular opponents. Morsi managed to push the controversial document through after a political crisis brought on by his declaration a month ago giving himself wide-ranging emergency powers. Although Morsi rolled back much of that decree - amid massive protests and street clashes - he insisted on bringing the new constitution to a referendum.
WORLD
July 15, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton met for the first time Saturday with new President Mohamed Morsi in a fresh push to strengthen U.S.-Egyptian relations as the country enters an era of unpredictability in which an Islamist leader is clashing with a secular military over control of the nation. Clinton's talks with Morsi signaled a historic shift from the days when U.S. diplomats visited President Hosni Mubarak, a stalwart American partner on countering terrorism and preserving Egypt's peace treaty with Israel.
OPINION
November 29, 2011
Last week's protests in Cairo and Monday's parliamentary elections represent two faces of post-Hosni Mubarak Egypt, one hopeful and one pessimistic. So far, notwithstanding a huge election turnout, pessimism seems the more realistic attitude. Despite superficial concessions, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces seems determined to exercise power even after a new president and parliament are installed. That explains the protests last week in which demonstrators called on the military to relinquish power sooner rather than later.
WORLD
November 25, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
They came by the tens of thousands, swelling through neighborhoods, marching over bridges and pouring into Tahrir Square on Friday in the biggest protest yet against Egypt's increasingly isolated military rulers. Workers, mothers, activists, students and doctors, their numbers multiplying into nightfall, rallied in spirit and defiance reminiscent of the chilly February days that marked the end of Hosni Mubarak's regime. Dubbed "Last Chance Friday," the demonstration had the hardened determination of a battle and the air of a carnival.
OPINION
February 15, 2011
Now, Egypt's future Re " 'Hope for the future,' " Feb. 12 What is the future for the Egyptian people? I am reminded of Benjamin Franklin's response to the woman who asked him as he emerged from the constitutional convention in Philadelphia, "What do we have?" He replied: "A republic, madam, if we can keep it. " That will now be the challenge for the Egyptian people. America has survived many challenges, wars and even a civil war. The democracy we cherish can get pretty messy at times, yet the Star Spangled Banner still waves, the hope lives on and the dream has never died.
WORLD
February 14, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
The news was only a couple of hours old and already the art of the revolution was being replaced with the art of the resignation. For a week on the edge of Tahrir Square, the fledgling League of the Revolution's Artists had churned out drawings and caricatures, poems and plays inspired by Hosni Mubarak's 30 years of autocratic rule. A selection of the works were plastered on the outdoor glass wall of a KFC restaurant outside which they had set up base. President Hosni Mubarak stealing money.
OPINION
February 12, 2011
Every lover of liberty will share in the exhilaration of the Egyptian people after the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. A revolt by students, young professionals and workers ousted a dictator who had ruled his country in the guise of a democrat for 30 years. It may be that intervention by the military was the immediate cause of Mubarak's dramatic turnabout the day after he refused to step down, but there's no question that the primary authors of his overthrow were the Egyptian people.
OPINION
February 12, 2011
A new day in Egypt Re Hosni Mubarak's resignation, Feb. 12 As a lifelong admirer and student of Egypt, it is a wonderful thing to see Egyptians' determination and success in ridding themselves of a dictator. But the future will be even more difficult. Making a democracy work is harder than opposing a dictator. It will be messy, frustrating and require compromise and hard work ? and there will be no one to blame anymore but the people themselves. Egypt's friends can only advise, support and encourage.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
In an interview with Bill O'Reilly, President Obama said Sunday that he's confident a new Egyptian government would continue to be a partner of the United States, and he again called on President Hosni Mubarak to allow for an orderly transition to a new representative government. "Egypt is not going to go back to what it was," Obama said during the interview on Fox's Super Bowl pregame telecast. "The Egyptian people want freedom, they want free and fair elections, they want a representative government, they want a responsive government.
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