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Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak

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WORLD
February 10, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused to step down Thursday but said in a nationally televised speech that he would hand more authority to his vice president, a move that drew rage and bewilderment from hundreds of thousands of protesters packed into Cairo's Tahrir Square. The nation was anticipating an address that would mark the end of Mubarak's 30 years in power but instead was told he was going nowhere. Protesters shouted "leave, leave," and chants of disapproval echoed across the Nile at the prospect that the 17-day standoff with the government was not over.
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WORLD
May 28, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's 2011 uprising was often referred to as a youth revolution, but two years after longtime President Hosni Mubarak was forced out of office, many in the younger generation say they feel more politically isolated than ever. The country is beset by severe political and social divisions as the struggle between the ruling Muslim Brotherhood and its opponents persists. Young activists across the political spectrum say they have been sidelined, prevented from participating in the leadership and management of post-Mubarak Egypt by a patriarchal culture that favors the older and supposedly more experienced.
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OPINION
January 28, 2011
When popular protests broke out in Tunisia, prompting the president to flee the country, some observers predicted a domino effect that would upend other authoritarian Arab regimes. Demonstrations in Egypt have made prophets of those prognosticators ? but only up to a point. Startling as the images of crowds in Cairo may be, the regime of President Hosni Mubarak is better armed and more entrenched than that in Tunisia. Nor, despite superficial similarities, is Egypt analogous to Iran in 1979, when Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi was toppled by a revolt that eventually turned the country into an Islamic theocracy.
WORLD
January 13, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Former President Hosni Mubarak was granted a new murder trial by an Egyptian appeals court Sunday, a ruling that threatens fresh political turmoil as the country braces for parliamentary elections amid widening economic hardship. The decision overturned life sentences for Mubarak and his interior minister, Habib Adli, for complicity in the deaths of more than 850 protesters during the 2011 uprising. Both men face other criminal investigations and are expected to remain in detention until the new trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
As protesters in Egypt continued to call for the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, former Vice President Dick Cheney urged U.S. leaders to remember that Mubarak was "a good man" and important friend to the United States and said he hoped that the Obama administration would seek "balance" in its approach to the fast-moving events overseas. Cheney's remarks came in the midst of a discussion of former President Ronald Reagan's legacy at a panel in Santa Barbara on Saturday night.
WORLD
February 11, 2011 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Los Angeles Times
Less than 24 hours after a patronizing speech in which he insisted he wouldn't resign, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak fled his palace by helicopter and left it to his newly appointed vice president to tell the nation he had turned power over to the military. The dramatic end to Mubarak's 30 years in power came after a day of widespread confusion over who really ruled Egypt, and massive demonstrations that spread far from Cairo's central Tahrir Square, the nerve center of the protests for more than two weeks.
WORLD
February 11, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused to step down Thursday, saying in a nationally televised speech that he would hand authority to his vice president in a move that enraged and bewildered hundreds of thousands of protesters packed into Cairo's Tahrir Square. The country was anticipating an address that would mark the end of Mubarak's 30 years in power but instead was told that he was going nowhere. Protesters shouted, "Leave! Leave!" and chants of disapproval echoed across the Nile at the prospect that the 17-day standoff with the government was not over.
WORLD
January 28, 2011 | By Paul Richter and David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
President Obama prodded besieged Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to "take concrete steps and actions that deliver" on reforms that Mubarak promised in a speech early Saturday to Egyptians, suggesting that continued American support for his regime will depend on immediate action. Obama, describing a candid 30-minute telephone conversation he had with the Egyptian leader shortly after Mubarak's televised address, said protesters' "grievances have built up over time" because Mubarak has failed to address Egyptians' desire for more open government and improved economic opportunities.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Amro Hassan and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  In his first public speech since he was forced from power two months ago, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said Sunday that he and his family were victims of a campaign by political enemies seeking to tarnish their reputation by exaggerating their wealth with false charges of corruption. The pre-recorded audio address came the same day the Egyptian prosecutor general's office announced that Mubarak and sons Gamal — who many believed would have been his successor — and Alaa were summoned for questioning regarding the violence that left about 300 people dead during the revolt that toppled the regime on Feb. 11. The legal move appeared to be an attempt by the country's ruling military council to appease protesters who have criticized the army for not moving swiftly enough to indict Mubarak and his inner circle.
WORLD
September 7, 2011 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
A senior Egyptian police official was charged with perjury Wednesday after testifying in the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak that security forces did not use live ammunition against protesters in the revolution that overthrew the leader. The decision by Judge Ahmed Refaat to charge the officer bolstered the prosecution, which over two days has been embarrassed by key witnesses who are said to have recanted earlier statements implicating Mubarak's regime. Families of hundreds of victims reportedly shot by police last winter fear that the deposed president, charged with complicity to commit murder, may be not be convicted.
WORLD
December 14, 2012 | By Lauren Frayer
MADRID -- Two mansions in Madrid, five luxury cars and seven seaside Mediterranean properties linked to former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak have been seized by Spanish police. In all, Spain has frozen more than $36.5 million in assets believed to belong to Mubarak, the autocratic leader ousted by public protests in February 2011. The seizure followed a request from the new Egyptian government, which is seeking to recoup assets from Mubarak and 130 people associated with his regime.
WORLD
September 9, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
A former high-ranking security official testified Thursday that forces loyal to Hosni Mubarak were ordered to use excessive force to crush protests in the early days of a revolution that would later topple the president. The police general's testimony said the order came from then-Interior Minister Habib Adli, an accusation that suggests the highest levels of the Mubarak government plotted the crackdown that killed more than 800 people from Jan. 25 through Feb. 11. It was unclear, however, whether Adli directly called for firing live ammunition.
WORLD
September 7, 2011 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
A senior Egyptian police official was charged with perjury Wednesday after testifying in the trial of former President Hosni Mubarak that security forces did not use live ammunition against protesters in the revolution that overthrew the leader. The decision by Judge Ahmed Refaat to charge the officer bolstered the prosecution, which over two days has been embarrassed by key witnesses who are said to have recanted earlier statements implicating Mubarak's regime. Families of hundreds of victims reportedly shot by police last winter fear that the deposed president, charged with complicity to commit murder, may be not be convicted.
WORLD
July 13, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Stock prices are sliding, protesters are clamoring, generals are fuming and the once-respected prime minister is maneuvering to hang on to his job. The revolution that swept Egypt last winter remains messy and unfinished in the swelter of summer. Protesters are again camping in Cairo's Tahrir Square, hunger strikes are reported across the country and the ruling military council is not moving quickly enough for demonstrators in bringing former President Hosni Mubarak and his regime to justice.
WORLD
June 23, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Just outside his office at the Arab League, Amr Moussa displays the typical power photos of Western politicians: handshake snapshots with the king of Spain, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Clinton. But in other photos, the longtime diplomat who is Egypt's leading presidential contender appears beside Syrian President Bashar Assad, Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi and ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. With the photos serving as a reminder of how close Moussa was to the previous Egyptian regime and to world leaders now likewise threatened by popular uprisings, the Arab League secretary-general faces a difficult balancing act in the coming months as he tries to position himself as both political veteran and reformer.
WORLD
May 25, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Egypt will put Hosni Mubarak, its president for three decades, on trial in connection with the deaths of protesters during the uprising that forced him from office, prosecutors said Tuesday, raising the prospect that the region's push for reform would force a modern Arab strongman to face justice before his own people. Adel Said, a spokesman for Egypt's prosecutor general, said Mubarak could face the death penalty on charges that he conspired in the killings. But the announcement appeared aimed at least in part at appeasing victims' families and blunting a major demonstration planned for Friday.
WORLD
February 18, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Doha Al Zohairy, Los Angeles Times
The song just came to him. Boiling with anger on that first day of February after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused to step down, Ramy Essam grabbed his guitar. Within 20 minutes, he banged out lyrics cobbled together from the chants of the crowd in Tahrir Square, and then climbed a wobbly stage. "All of us are standing together, asking for one simple thing: Leave, leave, leave, leave," he sang, in a hypnotic echo of the words that had ricocheted through the square all day. "He will leave, because we won't leave.
WORLD
February 3, 2011 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Ned Parker and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Gunfire erupted in downtown Cairo again Thursday afternoon when anti-government protesters broke out of their barricades on the edge of Tahrir Square. It was the second day of violent clashes between opponents and supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. A few dozen army soldiers fired over the protestors' heads in an attempt to push them back. But pro- and anti-government protestors are well aware that the army has pledged not to use force, rendering the small number of soldiers on the ground ineffectual, reduced at times to trying to wave protesters away.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Amro Hassan and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  In his first public speech since he was forced from power two months ago, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said Sunday that he and his family were victims of a campaign by political enemies seeking to tarnish their reputation by exaggerating their wealth with false charges of corruption. The pre-recorded audio address came the same day the Egyptian prosecutor general's office announced that Mubarak and sons Gamal — who many believed would have been his successor — and Alaa were summoned for questioning regarding the violence that left about 300 people dead during the revolt that toppled the regime on Feb. 11. The legal move appeared to be an attempt by the country's ruling military council to appease protesters who have criticized the army for not moving swiftly enough to indict Mubarak and his inner circle.
WORLD
March 21, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
Egyptians moved further beyond the legacy of former President Hosni Mubarak's strongman rule by voting overwhelmingly to amend the nation's constitution and head swiftly toward parliamentary and presidential elections, according to results of a referendum announced Sunday. The referendum, which calls for judicial oversight of elections and limited presidential terms, was the first step to bring Egypt closer to a democracy after decades of corrupt one-party rule. The outcome is expected to spur chaotic, if exciting, races for parliament and president in coming months.
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