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Ehime Maru Ship

NEWS
March 6, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deadly collision between a U.S. submarine and a Japanese fishing vessel was caused by a series of equipment and personnel problems, capped by a sonar technician's puzzling failure to provide information to the captain that could have averted the disaster, an admiral testified Monday. Rear Adm. Charles Griffiths Jr.
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NEWS
March 2, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a small Japanese town, the American admiral bowed his head in contrition before grieving family members hanging on his every word. In the middle of the Pacific, the submarine commander wept as he delivered personal letters of apology. For a nation where symbolism is important, the television images Thursday went a long way toward easing public anger and frustration over last month's horrifying collision of a U.S. nuclear submarine and a Japanese high school training ship.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special envoy from Washington delivered a personal apology Tuesday from President Bush to Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori for a U.S. submarine's collision with a Japanese trawler that left nine people missing and presumed dead. The envoy, Navy Adm. William Fallon, also met today with Cabinet ministers and the fathers of two of the students who apparently died in the crash to apologize for the Feb. 9 tragedy.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The investigation into the collision between a U.S. submarine and a Japanese fishing vessel off the coast of Hawaii raises questions about the "command climate" aboard the submarine, according to two retired submarine skippers who have been closely following the case. The retired captains do not have firsthand knowledge of what happened aboard the fast-attack nuclear submarine Greeneville before it collided with the 190-foot Ehime Maru while performing an emergency surfacing drill on Feb. 9.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Coast Guard said Wednesday that it plans to end its search tonight for nine people missing after a U.S. nuclear submarine collided with a Japanese trawler, as Navy officials investigated whether 16 civilians aboard the sub may have distracted its crew before the crash. While most of the survivors from the Ehime Maru flew home Wednesday, Navy officials also acknowledged that their probe could lead to criminal charges against one or more crew members of the attack sub Greeneville.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two civilians were at the controls of the nuclear-powered U.S. submarine Greeneville when it collided with a Japanese fishing vessel, leaving nine people lost at sea, a Navy official said Tuesday. The news prompted outrage from survivors of the accident, who spoke publicly for the first time. Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | MARIA L. LaGANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN and TONY PERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As tearful relatives of those missing at sea visited the site of the collision between a U.S. submarine and a Japanese fishing trawler, the Navy dispatched two high-tech undersea vehicles Monday to scour the ocean floor for wreckage--and possibly to recover bodies. Nine crew members, students and teachers who were aboard the trawler when it sank nine miles off Diamond Head on Friday still are unaccounted for.
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