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Ehud Brak

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NEWS
May 18, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning upheaval of Israeli politics, Ehud Barak--a decorated soldier who has vowed to seek peace with the same Arabs he once was assigned to kill--on Monday defeated Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a landslide. Netanyahu, faced with a devastating indictment of his three-year tenure, abruptly quit the leadership of his center-right Likud Party after the overwhelming loss.
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NEWS
May 18, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning upheaval of Israeli politics, Ehud Barak--a decorated soldier who has vowed to seek peace with the same Arabs he once was assigned to kill--on Monday defeated Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a landslide. Netanyahu, faced with a devastating indictment of his three-year tenure, abruptly quit the leadership of his center-right Likud Party after the overwhelming loss.
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NEWS
May 18, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the eight years he has spent in Israel, Russian-born Adolph Loshak has always voted for the right-of-center Likud Party, feeling comfortable with its tough positions on issues of peace and security. Until Monday. Standing in the dappled sunlight in this city's central park, Loshak said he agonized but finally decided to cast his ballot in Monday's Israeli elections for Ehud Barak, the leader of the center-left Labor Party, rather than Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Likud leader.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the eight years he has spent in Israel, Russian-born Adolph Loshak has always voted for the right-of-center Likud Party, feeling comfortable with its tough positions on issues of peace and security. Until Monday. Standing in the dappled sunlight in this city's central park, Loshak said he agonized but finally decided to cast his ballot in Monday's Israeli elections for Ehud Barak, the leader of the center-left Labor Party, rather than Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Likud leader.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an overwhelming victory in Monday's elections, incoming Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak is expected to move quickly to revive the peace process with the Palestinians after three years of bitter stalemate. But even in the first flush of victory over incumbent Benjamin Netanyahu and his right-of-center Likud Party, Barak's supporters cautioned that the prime minister-elect, a former army chief of staff, is likely to take a more "sober"--in other words, tougher--approach to the U.S.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an overwhelming victory in Monday's elections, incoming Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak is expected to move quickly to revive the peace process with the Palestinians after three years of bitter stalemate. But even in the first flush of victory over incumbent Benjamin Netanyahu and his right-of-center Likud Party, Barak's supporters cautioned that the prime minister-elect, a former army chief of staff, is likely to take a more "sober"--in other words, tougher--approach to the U.S.
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