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Eighth Amendment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989
With its decision Monday that the Constitution does not forbid the execution of teen-agers and the mentally retarded, the U.S Supreme Court has done violence not only to the Eighth Amendment, but also to the ability of Americans to stand unblushing among the civilized peoples of the world. If the constitutional prohibition of "cruel and unusual punishment" does not preclude the state-sanctioned killings of those who only have attained a child's years and never will attain more than a child's mind, it is difficult to determine what--short of drawing and quartering--it does forbid.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
The state of Texas on Thursday executed a man named Tommy Sells after a series of whipsawing court decisions that ultimately denied Sells his due process right to investigate whether the lethal injection met constitutional standards. This is no defense of Sells. If evil exists in this world, he was it , responsible for a series of known heinous murders, and who knows how many others. But that is still insufficient cause for the government to kill him. It is sufficient cause to have locked Sells away from society until he died of natural causes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1991
So Will believes that the Second Amendment is embarrassing? He finds it difficult to reconcile his strict constructionist views with the right to keep and bears arms and so he advocates a de-constitutionalization of the amendment. My question is "Why stop there, George?" There is so much more work to do. Other amendments are equally embarrassing. Examples abound: (1) That embarrassing Eighth Amendment--cruel and unusual punishment for convicted criminals? There is no such thing.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court ended its term Thursday by upholding a sentence of life in prison for first-time drug possession and declaring that victims' rights, not just defendants' rights, may be weighed in death penalty cases. The pair of rulings culminate a term in which the solidly conservative court not only gave police and prosecutors more power but overruled decisions that had protected the rights of defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989
The Eighth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States reads: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted." The use of nunchakus on peaceful Operation Rescue protesters by the San Diego Police Department is clearly cruel and unusual. Their use has resulted in broken bones, sprains and other physical anguish. The San Diego police chief, city manager and members of the Citizens Advisory Board on Police-Community Relations believe that such measures are not cruel ("Advisory Board Supports Police Use of Nunchakus on Protesters," June 15)
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
The state of Texas on Thursday executed a man named Tommy Sells after a series of whipsawing court decisions that ultimately denied Sells his due process right to investigate whether the lethal injection met constitutional standards. This is no defense of Sells. If evil exists in this world, he was it , responsible for a series of known heinous murders, and who knows how many others. But that is still insufficient cause for the government to kill him. It is sufficient cause to have locked Sells away from society until he died of natural causes.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court ended its term Thursday by upholding a sentence of life in prison for first-time drug possession and declaring that victims' rights, not just defendants' rights, may be weighed in death penalty cases. The pair of rulings culminate a term in which the solidly conservative court not only gave police and prosecutors more power but overruled decisions that had protected the rights of defendants.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | JOHN ROLL, Associated Press
Knowing one's way around a law library is such a marketable skill at Nevada's maximum-security prison that some inmates are charging fellow prisoners hundreds of dollars for legal advice. However, one jail-house lawyer saw a thriving practice end when prison officials received a letter from the parents of another inmate, respectfully inquiring where to send the $1,000 to pay for their son's inmate law clerk.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court said Monday it will decide whether nonsmokers in prison have a constitutional right to be free from secondary tobacco smoke. The court agreed to review a Nevada inmate's claim that environmental tobacco smoke unlawfully threatens his health. A decision is expected in 1993. A federal appeals court ruled exposure to secondary smoke can be a constitutional violation if it poses an unreasonable health risk.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the dissent of Justice Clarence Thomas, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that prison guards violate the Constitution when they needlessly pummel, kick or torture prison inmates, even if the blows do not cause permanent injury. The 7-2 decision reinstated an $800 award to a Louisiana inmate who was handcuffed and shackled by guards, then kicked from behind and punched in the face. He suffered bruises and loosened teeth and a dental plate was damaged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1991
So Will believes that the Second Amendment is embarrassing? He finds it difficult to reconcile his strict constructionist views with the right to keep and bears arms and so he advocates a de-constitutionalization of the amendment. My question is "Why stop there, George?" There is so much more work to do. Other amendments are equally embarrassing. Examples abound: (1) That embarrassing Eighth Amendment--cruel and unusual punishment for convicted criminals? There is no such thing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989
With its decision Monday that the Constitution does not forbid the execution of teen-agers and the mentally retarded, the U.S Supreme Court has done violence not only to the Eighth Amendment, but also to the ability of Americans to stand unblushing among the civilized peoples of the world. If the constitutional prohibition of "cruel and unusual punishment" does not preclude the state-sanctioned killings of those who only have attained a child's years and never will attain more than a child's mind, it is difficult to determine what--short of drawing and quartering--it does forbid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989
The Eighth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States reads: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted." The use of nunchakus on peaceful Operation Rescue protesters by the San Diego Police Department is clearly cruel and unusual. Their use has resulted in broken bones, sprains and other physical anguish. The San Diego police chief, city manager and members of the Citizens Advisory Board on Police-Community Relations believe that such measures are not cruel ("Advisory Board Supports Police Use of Nunchakus on Protesters," June 15)
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | JOHN ROLL, Associated Press
Knowing one's way around a law library is such a marketable skill at Nevada's maximum-security prison that some inmates are charging fellow prisoners hundreds of dollars for legal advice. However, one jail-house lawyer saw a thriving practice end when prison officials received a letter from the parents of another inmate, respectfully inquiring where to send the $1,000 to pay for their son's inmate law clerk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1989
The San Diego police have been using a technique that they call "pain compliance," a not-too-subtle euphemism for torture, to facilitate arrests. Results, according to protesters, have included broken bones, dislocations, nerve damage and other injuries, as well as pain. The silence of the civil liberties community has been dismaying. If a judge were to order such torture, or the Legislature to permit it, the outcry would be immediate. The Eighth Amendment forbids the infliction of cruel and unusual punishment.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The attorneys for a small-time, 23-year-old South-Central Los Angeles drug dealer will invoke one of the most basic precepts of American law today by trying to persuade a federal appeals court that it would be "cruel and unusual punishment" to keep him in prison for the rest of his life. They are appealing the December, 1989, decision of a Los Angeles federal judge to sentence Richard V.
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