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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
There wasn't much of a theatrical appetite for "Hannibal Rising" -- Thomas Harris' prequel to "Red Dragon" and "Silence of the Lambs" -- when it opened earlier this year. The grisly horror film took in just $27.7 million domestically -- compare that with 1991's "Silence of the Lambs," which made $130.7 million; 2001's "Hannibal," which took in $165.1 million; and 2002's "Red Dragon," which earned $93.1 million.
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NEWS
June 21, 1992 | BRYAN MINGLE, Times Staff Writer
His loss at expressing his early sexual identity with ease is one reason why playwright-director Sean Mathias jumped at the chance to make "The Lost Language of Cranes" his first screenplay. The 1986 critically acclaimed book by David Leavitt is the story of a son who tells his mother and father that he is gay, an announcement that compels the father to end his own lie of 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov writes about theater for Calendar.
In October's theater lineup, Shakespeare gets a new look, Virginia Woolf goes solo, "Gorey Stories" go for the jugular, and "The Most Happy Fella" goes Hollywood. The openings include: Tuesday: At Hollywood's Henry Fonda Theatre, David Carradine, Stewart Granger, Ricardo Montalban and Lynn Redgrave star in George Bernard Shaw's philosophical dialogue "Don Juan in Hell."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE
The Westwood Playhouse will play host to what could be the solo highlight of a still-sketchy fall season when British actress Eileen Atkins delivers her uncommon performance as the lecturing Virginia Woolf in "A Room of One's Own," starting Oct. 16. This will follow close on the heels of Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca, together again--at last--in "Together Again" (Sept. 20-Oct.13).
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Langton, who portrayed the stiffly proper tetrarch of the upstairs in "Upstairs, Downstairs," has died, it was learned Friday. Langton, better known as Lord Richard Bellamy in the internationally praised British television series of the 1970s, was 82. His family said he died of a heart attack Monday at Stratford-Upon-Avon. No details of his death or funeral arrangements were announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | RAY LOYND
If you were an "Upstairs, Downstairs" junkie, you might want to feast on its sequel of sorts: "The House of Eliott," a sumptuous 12-hour, 10-part BBC dramatic series about two struggling sisters who crash high society in 1920s London. If the premiere two-hour episode (Sunday at 9 p.m. on cable's Arts & Entertainment), is any index, co-creators Jean Marsh and Eileen Atkins, the creative team behind "Upstairs, Downstairs," have fashioned another winning social tableau of period manners and mores.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2001 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles premiere of Yasmina Reza's "The Unexpected Man," David Rambo's "God's Man in Texas" and "Do Jump!"--a circus performance ensemble that blends dance, acrobatics, aerial work, humor and music--will be among the offerings onstage during the 2001-2002 season at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood. The season lineup, to be announced today by Geffen producing director Gilbert Cates, kicks off Sept. 19-Oct.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Upstairs Downstairs" was one of the most popular and acclaimed series ever to air on PBS' long-running "Masterpiece Theatre." But it has been impossible to find copies of favorite episodes at local video stores. Until now. After a long absence from video store shelves, fans of the series can now enjoy the handsome new Collector's Edition, released last month on A&E Home Video. The set, which runs for $150, features 14 complete episodes on 7 videos.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Upstairs, Downstairs" was something veddy different for PBS' acclaimed British drama showcase "Masterpiece Theatre." The 68-part series holds the distinction of being the first "Masterpiece" presentation to be created strictly for television with no claims to literature, the theater or movies. "Upstairs, Downstairs" proved that a masterpiece could be created for the small screen. Rather ironically, the series spawned several novelization productions.
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