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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Staff Writer
Anyone credulous enough to accept "Einstein on the Beach: The Changing Image of Opera" as merely a PBS documentary about the 1984 Brooklyn revival of a celebrated postmodern music/theatre piece is ready to be sold the Brooklyn Bridge as well. Despite its newsy collage of rehearsal and interview footage, this hourlong Mark Obenhaus video project (tonight at 8 on Channel 24, and at 9 on Channels 28 and 15) is essentially a work of sanctimonious puffery.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013
Arik Einstein Israeli pop singer, movie actor Arik Einstein, 74, a beloved Israeli singer and cultural icon whose voice was called the soundtrack of a nation, died Tuesday at a hospital in Tel-Aviv after collapsing at his home. He died of an aneurysm, according to Gaby Barabash, director of Tel-Aviv's Ichilov Medical Center. Born in Tel-Aviv in 1939, Arik (Aryeh) Einstein was a star athlete as a teenager. When called up for military service in the 1950s, the nearsighted youth was barred from combat service and tried out for an army entertainment troupe, almost accidentally launching a career that would span 50 years and most of the nation's history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Plans to present the Brooklyn Academy of Music's production of the Robert Wilson-Philip Glass opera "Einstein on the Beach" in Los Angeles have been dropped, The Times has learned. Over the weekend, an ad-hoc committee led by three locally based lawyers (Bernard Greenberg, Richard Sherwood and Stanley Grinstein) threw in the towel after a lengthy period of negotiations with the academy to bring the 8-year-old work to Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Agent Roger Richman had a ton of celebrity clients - James Cagney, Mae West, Maria Callas, Albert Einstein, the Marx brothers, Sigmund Freud, Gypsy Rose Lee and W.C. Fields, to name a few. Contrary to expectations, none of them were overly demanding. "I don't have people calling me in the middle of the night saying there aren't enough red M&Ms in the Green Room," he told The Times in a 2001 interview. The reason was simple: By the time he began advocating for them, they were long dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
BERKELEY - The magic is back. Boy, is it ever. Philip Glass and Robert Wilson created "Einstein on the Beach" in 1976, and neither music nor music theater - including, and especially, opera - has ever been quite the same since. Glass' score, which made him famous, can be heard on complete recordings made in 1976 and 1992. Wilson's images, which made him famous, have been widely reproduced. That has been enough for the opera to have become the most influential of the past 50 years.
OPINION
April 13, 2005
With "Relativity Speaking, Einstein Was a Slacker" (Commentary, April 11), you do harm just to get a laugh. True, Einstein's later work didn't match his early achievements, his scientific judgment was not unerring, and he was not a saint. But he did not coast later in his career, and his promotion of socially responsible science was a significant contribution in itself. Science has a tough enough time these days. Please don't make it tougher by mocking it falsely like this. Steve Miller San Diego
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
There is an anecdote about Einstein from when he taught at Caltech in the early 1930s. One day, pianist and Beethoven specialist Artur Schnabel came to visit the famed physicist, who was an avid amateur violinist, and they read through a Beethoven violin sonata. It didn't go well. Fumbling a tricky rhythm, Einstein got lost, and Schnabel exclaimed in frustration, "Albert, you can't count!" I have no idea how true this is (there are variants of the story), but what matters is that 80 years later, Einstein counted at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, and it was a momentous event.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Everyone has had the experience of disagreeing with a critic, but do critics ever second-guess themselves? We asked Calendar's critics whether there are any reviews they regret. One in a series of occasional articles. -- Since 1976, I have enjoyed the music of Philip Glass. Before then, I did not. "Einstein on the Beach" changed everything. Experiencing the five-hour opera with its repetitious score performed without a break, no real text and a staging by Robert Wilson full of unforgettable images may not have been the full-blown religious conversion for me that it had been to some.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1986
Having read the article on Paul Conrad in the Wall Street Journal (Sept. 22), I can only conclude that his poster of Einstein, which hangs in his office with Einstein's famous quote regarding "great spirits" receiving opposition from mediocre minds, is an admission to being the mediocre mind that opposes great spirits like President Reagan. CRAIG FURNAS Corona del Mar
OPINION
July 14, 2009 | Jesselyn Radack, Jesselyn Radack is the homeland security director of the Government Accountability Project in Washington.
Cyber security is a real issue, as evidenced by the virus behind July 4 cyber attacks that hobbled government and business websites in the United States and South Korea. It originated from Internet provider addresses in 16 countries and targeted, among others, the White House and the New York Stock Exchange. Unfortunately, the Obama administration has chosen to combat it in a move that runs counter to its pledge to be transparent.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
There is an anecdote about Einstein from when he taught at Caltech in the early 1930s. One day, pianist and Beethoven specialist Artur Schnabel came to visit the famed physicist, who was an avid amateur violinist, and they read through a Beethoven violin sonata. It didn't go well. Fumbling a tricky rhythm, Einstein got lost, and Schnabel exclaimed in frustration, "Albert, you can't count!" I have no idea how true this is (there are variants of the story), but what matters is that 80 years later, Einstein counted at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, and it was a momentous event.
SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
Albert Einstein had a colossal corpus callosum. And when it comes to this particular piece of neural real estate, it's pretty clear that size matters. Chances are, that brawny bundle of white matter cleaving the Swiss physicist's brain from front to back is part of what made his mind so phenomenally creative. The corpus callosum carries electrical signals between the brain's right hemisphere and its left. Stretching nearly the full length of the brain from behind the forehead to the nape of the neck, the corpus callosum is the dense network of neural fibers that make brain regions with very different functions work together.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Near the end of Steven T. Seagle and Teddy Kristiansen's haunting graphic novel “Genius” (First Second: 126 pp., $17.99 paper), the main character, a physicist named Ted, has an epiphany of a kind. Ted was once a prodigy, a kid so smart he almost couldn't be taught, recruited at 22 to be part of the research team at the prestigious Pasadena Technical Institute. And then? Crickets, a decade or more of journeyman work, a realignment of his priorities. Ted has two kids, and a wife who may be dying; his father-in-law, who lives with them, treats him with a mix of disdain and outright hate.
SCIENCE
May 13, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
These days, it's not just finding an exoplanet. It's how you find that Earth-like body. Scientists using sophisticated telescopes and arrays can detect a planet revolving around a distant star by looking at radial velocity of the star (a faint wobble) or a “transit” of that planet across the star (a faint dimming). But no one has ever found one via “induced relativistic beaming of light” from the host star. Why would that be a big deal? It happens to be a method that relies on Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Edward A. Frieman, a leading figure in American science for decades as a researcher with wide-ranging interests, a top-level governmental advisor on defense and energy issues, and director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, has died. He was 87. Frieman died April 11 at UCSD's Thornton Hospital in La Jolla of a respiratory illness, the university announced. His legacy extends to leadership posts in academia, government and private industry. There are "not many like him, and he will be sorely missed," said John Deutch, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and former CIA director and deputy secretary of Defense.
SCIENCE
April 26, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Albert Einstein has been dead for nearly 60 years, relatively speaking, and he's still being tested. Theoretically, at least. General relativity, the theory for which the German-born theoretical physicist is best known, holds up even in the more outlying phenomena of distant space, scientists have found. Astronomers studied a neutron star about 7,000 light years from Earth that is twice as heavy as our sun but only about 12 miles in diameter. The gravity of this spinning, highly magnetic star, or pulsar, is about 300 billion times stronger than the force that's holding your feet to the ground.
OPINION
November 21, 1999
Congratulations on a nearly understandable article about the very complex subject of string theory (Nov. 16). So apparently, in addition to the three dimensions of space plus the one of time, there are seven basic strings (types of energy) that, when combined in the millions of combinations possible, make up everything in our universe that we see and don't see. That would explain why there are seven basic notes in the musical universe, seven basic colors in the visual universe, and why seven is considered a sacred number in nearly all the world's major religions.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Squinting into the dark heart of the Milky Way, astronomers have discovered the closest star yet to the galaxy's supermassive black hole. The relatively dim star, S0-102, takes just 11.5 years to circle the black hole.  The previous record-holder, S0-2, took 16 years to make its way around. A black hole is a star whose mass has collapsed to a point, a singularity. Its intense gravity distorts space-time so much that not even light can escape. The one at the center of the Milky Way contains the mass of 4 million suns.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
With Montecito magically misted by a surprising spring drizzle Wednesday night, Jennifer Koh went, for a second time, beyond Bach. The violinist's awe-inspiring solo recital at the Music Academy of the West's Hahn Hall was the latest installment in her project of moderating a conversation between Bach's solo violin sonatas and partitas with history as a way to bring music of the past into the present. And this time Einstein may have had a little something to do with the violinist's penetrating playing of Bach and Bartók in this beach town.
SCIENCE
April 4, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Einstein was right about relativity, again. NASA's Kepler space telescope has beamed back the latest evidence that light can be bent by gravity, an element of the theory of general relativity. It's not that astrophysicists expect observations to contradict Albert. But the findings represent the first time the phenomenon has been detected in a binary star system, according to NASA. In this case, a dead star, known as a white dwarf, bent the light from its partner, a small “red dwarf.”  The density of the much smaller white dwarf is far greater than that of its partner.
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