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December 22, 2000 | Associated Press
Vodafone Group of Britain, the world's largest mobile phone company, agreed to buy the Eircell wireless unit from Eircom of Ireland for about $4.1 billion in stock. Eircell has an estimated 60% share of Ireland's mobile phone market, with more than 1.2 million subscribers.
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BUSINESS
December 22, 2000 | Associated Press
Vodafone Group of Britain, the world's largest mobile phone company, agreed to buy the Eircell wireless unit from Eircom of Ireland for about $4.1 billion in stock. Eircell has an estimated 60% share of Ireland's mobile phone market, with more than 1.2 million subscribers.
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TRAVEL
December 31, 2000
Hawaii--Dorothy Feng, Westminster: "Kauai ATV Eco-Sport, P.O. Box 800, Kalaheo 96741; telephone (808) 742-2734, Internet http://www.kauai.net/kauaiatv. Guided three- to four-hour ATV rides on old sugar cane roads through gorgeous, remote areas on Kauai's south side. Five tours daily, seven days a week." Rates: $85-$125; $10 discount for children. Ireland--Babs Schrager, Rancho Mirage: "Brook Manor Lodge, Fenit Road, Tralee, County Kerry; tel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2000 | BARBARA MURPHY
Power-One Inc. in Camarillo has acquired Norwegian-based Powec. Powec supplies power systems to major service providers and equipment manufacturers in the telecommunications industry. It is expected to ship more than $80 million in equipment this year, based on sales during the first four months of 2000. Powec's customers include Nokia, Vodafone, Ericsson, Eircom, Telia, Hong Kong Telecom, Telenor, Sonera and TeleDanmark.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2000 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, the question was whether free Internet service providers could survive in the shadow of pay-for-access king America Online. But most Internet analysts now agree that no-fee providers are here to stay, and the debate has shifted to which business model is likely to succeed. Two distinct strategies have surfaced in the free-access world. Westlake Village-based NetZero Inc. is spending heavily to create its own brand. Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Spinway Corp.
TRAVEL
June 24, 2001
Here are places to stay in some of the world's most popular destinations, recommended by readers of the Travel section during the last year. Prices or other details may have changed since the original publication. Be sure to check with the hotel, inn or B&B. The list has been edited for space. Worldwide Australia Cairns: Dr. Richard E. De Vey, Whittier: "Lilybank B&B, 75 Kamerunga Road, Stratford, Cairns, Queensland 4870; telephone 011-617-4055-1123, http://www.lilybank.com.au.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2001 | KARL ZIMMERMANN, Karl Zimmermann is a freelance writer in Norwood, N.J
We knew we had found the heartbeat of Irish music when the fellow behind the counter of the Traditional Music Shop interrupted his discourse on local venues to introduce the man coming through the door: "The singing postman, has his own band, plays at McDermott's." You don't have to be a Clancy Brother or a Chieftain to play in Doolin, a fishing town on the wild west coast of Ireland that has become a living museum of traditional Irish music.
MAGAZINE
March 19, 2000 | THOMAS KENEALLY, Thomas Keneally is an Australian writer of Irish descent whose books include "Schindler's List," "A River Town" and "The Great Shame."
These days Dublin is not the "dirty old town" of the Irish love ballad. It is a city of commercial confidence, the trendy young, BMWs and mobile phones. The boomtown of the new Ireland does its best to contradict the tales our grandparents told of Irish want and desolation. Even Frank McCourt's Limerick, in "Angela's Ashes" the grayest of Irish towns, is now doing its best to reverse the picture of melancholy, congenital want, hunger in the bone.
TRAVEL
March 16, 2008 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
We careened through the hectic maze of a traffic circle and spun off onto a seemingly quiet side road. A yellow-and-blue double-decker bus, its horn blaring, thundered toward us. "What's he doing on our side of the road?" I screamed to my friends. "We're on his side of the road," one answered. Could it be? The three of us had been in Ireland less than two hours and were about to be incinerated in a head-on collision. We swerved off the highway onto a dusty shoulder as the bus blew by. St.
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