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Eisa Davis

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011 | Jasmine Elist
"I'm in a play called 'This.' " "OK, what is it called?" "No, no, it's called 'This.' " "Yes? What? It's called what?" With a lighthearted laugh, Eisa Davis says she often encounters this response when revealing that she is in a new production of "This," which recently opened at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. The perplexity may be fitting for the universe playwright Melissa James Gibson has created: a world of confusion in which close friends enter a vulnerable time of unforeseen circumstances testing their expectations -- a time also known as middle age. Davis' work as an actor and a playwright has contributed to a textured career.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2011 | Jasmine Elist
"I'm in a play called 'This.' " "OK, what is it called?" "No, no, it's called 'This.' " "Yes? What? It's called what?" With a lighthearted laugh, Eisa Davis says she often encounters this response when revealing that she is in a new production of "This," which recently opened at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. The perplexity may be fitting for the universe playwright Melissa James Gibson has created: a world of confusion in which close friends enter a vulnerable time of unforeseen circumstances testing their expectations -- a time also known as middle age. Davis' work as an actor and a playwright has contributed to a textured career.
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NEWS
August 21, 2011
ATF: An article in the Aug. 16 LATExtra section reported that the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives had promoted three field supervisors of a controversial gun-trafficking surveillance operation to management positions at ATF headquarters in Washington. The ATF said in a statement Aug. 17 that the three supervisors were "laterally transferred" from operational duties into administrative roles, and were not promoted. Eisa Davis: An article in the Aug. 14 Arts & Books section about actress-playwright Eisa Davis said her mother Fania worked as a civil rights lawyer ensuring such things as wheelchair-accessible bathrooms and public recycling bins.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
There's little doubt that Greg Pak, the young writer-director of "Robot Stories," has plenty of moxie. Since Pak finished production on his debut feature in 2002, the anthology film about humans and their machine counterparts has screened in 50 festivals from Greece to Portugal, South Korea, Spain, Italy and Daytona Beach, Fla.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2008 | Mike Boehm, Boehm is a Times staff writer.
More than 20 years after making his first splash with "She's Gotta Have It," Spike Lee is finally going to make it to Sundance. His belated debut -- in the 25th year of the Sundance Film Festival -- comes as director and co-producer of the film version of "Passing Strange," the stage musical by Los Angeles indie rockers Stew (Mark Stewart) and Heidi Rodewald that took an unlikely passage from New York's nonprofit Public Theater to Broadway in February. It ran for 165 performances at the Belasco Theatre, with Stew nabbing a Tony Award for best book of a musical before it closed July 20. Among those captivated was Lee, who said Friday that he saw the show several times at the Public, then came back for repeat viewings at the Belasco -- even before producers approached him about capturing it on film before it closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
The five winners of this year's Alpert Award in the Arts will collect $75,000 each at ceremonies Friday afternoon at the Herb Alpert Foundation in Santa Monica. The award, given since 1995 by musician/record executive Alpert and his wife, Lani Hall, and administered by CalArts, focuses on mid-career artists and is one of the more lucrative annual arts prizes in the United States. The highest-profile winner is actor-playwright Eisa Davis , a 2007 Pulitzer Prize finalist for her drama “Bulrusher,” who also was part of the 2008 Obie Award-winning acting ensemble of the rock musical “Passing Strange” and a leading player last year in Melissa James Gibson's drama “This,” at the Kirk Douglas Theatre.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
A contentious drama pick, an apocalyptic novel by one of the nation's most reclusive writers and one of the first awards to a jazz musician were among the arts Pulitzers announced Monday. Cormac McCarthy, a rarely interviewed figure who has long been one of the most distinctive voices writing about the American West, won the fiction award for his novel "The Road."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
The latest winners of the annual Herb Alpert Awards in the Arts, which funnel $75,000 prizes to experimental artists in recognition of past achievements and future promise, include longtime L.A. visual art provocateur Daniel Joseph Martinez and four others based in Chicago or New York who didn't start making their marks until the 21st century. Martinez, who earned his master of fine art degree from California Institute of the Arts, which administers the Alpert Awards, has been exhibiting his work since the late 1970s and was included in both the 1993 and 2008 Whitney Biennials at New York's Whitney Museum of American Art. He grabbed attention in the 1993 Whitney group show by creating a simple white lapel button distributed to museum visitors that said, “I can't imagine ever wanting to be white.” CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat Martinez recently had an L.A. gallery show whose paintings and photographs were inspired by what he'd seen and heard over several years of riding Metro buses through the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2007 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
David Lindsay-Abaire is safely in the record books as a Pulitzer Prize winner for drama, having been honored Monday for "Rabbit Hole," a critically praised but stylistically conventional play about an investment banker and his wife trying to restart their lives and rescue their marriage after the death of their 4-year-old son.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
A quick perusal of the Pulitzer winners for drama clarifies what we've long suspected: Cutting-edge theater rarely carries home the prize. One could, in fact, construct a more dazzling influential repertory from the names left off the list. No Richard Foreman, Maria Irene Fornes, Adrienne Kennedy, Robert Wilson or Karen Finley. No Wooster Group, Mabou Mines, Anna Deavere Smith or Richard Maxwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1994 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Have you ever wondered what would have happened if you'd stayed in your hometown?" * So opens Joe Lucas' one-man show "Once a Man, Twice a Boy" at Theatre West. For Lucas, the question is rhetorical. If he had stayed in his small Pennsylvania hometown, he would have most likely mined coal, contracted black lung and died. Lucas is an anomaly, the first male in his family in generations to escape a grinding life of labor in the coal mines.
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