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Eisner Foundation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Victoriano Lopez Jr. stood in the doorway of his family's modest stucco home in Pacoima, smiling shyly at the people who had crowded into his frontyard Saturday bearing hopes for his uncertain future. His little sisters squeezed past him onto the sagging porch to see what all the commotion was about. The children's father, a construction worker born 45 years ago in Mexico, listened as a woman explained, in Spanish, the college scholarship earmarked for his 11-year-old son.
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BUSINESS
July 5, 2005 | Kim Christensen, Times Staff Writer
Given the acrimonious events of the recent past, some might have trouble picturing Michael Eisner warming himself by a campfire -- unless maybe Michael Ovitz were there, too, turning on a spit. Eisner is, after all, the guy who once called his old pal Ovitz "a psychopath" and referred to Jeffrey Katzenberg, his erstwhile Walt Disney Co. protege, as "the little midget."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Victoriano Lopez Jr. stood in the doorway of his family's modest stucco home, smiling shyly at the people who had crowded into his front yard Saturday bearing hopes for his uncertain future. His little sisters squeezed past him onto the sagging porch to see what all the commotion was about. The children's father, a Mexican-born construction worker, listened as a woman explained, in Spanish, the college scholarship earmarked for his 11-year-old son.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Victoriano Lopez Jr. stood in the doorway of his family's modest stucco home, smiling shyly at the people who had crowded into his front yard Saturday bearing hopes for his uncertain future. His little sisters squeezed past him onto the sagging porch to see what all the commotion was about. The children's father, a Mexican-born construction worker, listened as a woman explained, in Spanish, the college scholarship earmarked for his 11-year-old son.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2005 | Kim Christensen, Times Staff Writer
Given the acrimonious events of the recent past, some might have trouble picturing Michael Eisner warming himself by a campfire -- unless maybe Michael Ovitz were there, too, turning on a spit. Eisner is, after all, the guy who once called his old pal Ovitz "a psychopath" and referred to Jeffrey Katzenberg, his erstwhile Walt Disney Co. protege, as "the little midget."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Former Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Michael Eisner and his family's Eisner Foundation are giving $1.25 million to a program at the California Institute for the Arts that brings arts instruction to L.A.-area school children. The grant, to be paid in $250,000 installments over five years, is the largest ever received by CalArts' Community Arts Partnership, university officials said. The community arts program, launched 19 years ago, sends CalArts faculty, students and alumni into neighborhood schools and community centers to teach a wide range of courses in music, dance, theater and visual arts.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Walt Disney Co. Chairman Michael Eisner and his wife, Jane, donated 1 million shares of Disney stock worth $89 million last spring to a private family foundation, the company said Monday. The contribution to Eisner Foundation Inc. came on April 23. In making the donation, the Eisners formed a new foundation, which is being combined with an existing family foundation, a company spokesman said.
OPINION
November 24, 2003
"It Takes a Community" (editorial, Nov. 10) uses a recent high-profile fund-raiser for New York's public schools as the basis for asserting a "philanthropic drought" in Los Angeles. On the contrary, foundations support an abundance of educational efforts that benefit the Los Angeles Unified School District. The S. Mark Taper Foundation has given $750,000 to High Tech High-Los Angeles. The Eisner Foundation has committed $1.5 million to support Project GRAD (Graduation Really Achieves Dreams)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2002 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family foundation of Michael D. Eisner, the chairman and chief executive of Walt Disney Co., today will announce a $7-million gift to Cal State Northridge to establish a national center there for preparing teachers to cope with the vast learning differences among their students. The money, to be given over five years, represents the largest gift ever received by the campus. It will be used to infuse into classes for prospective teachers the philosophy of Dr.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The executive who heads the organization's Los Angeles branch makes more than $400,000 a year. His San Diego counterpart brings in $206,000. The head of a smaller office in New York earns $175,000. Salaries at a corporation? Guess again. That's the compensation for local presidents of the nonprofit Better Business Bureaus, which issue letter ratings to businesses that are supposed to reflect how fairly they treat consumers. The organization's national president earned $335,000 in 2008, according to the latest available documents from the Internal Revenue Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Victoriano Lopez Jr. stood in the doorway of his family's modest stucco home in Pacoima, smiling shyly at the people who had crowded into his frontyard Saturday bearing hopes for his uncertain future. His little sisters squeezed past him onto the sagging porch to see what all the commotion was about. The children's father, a construction worker born 45 years ago in Mexico, listened as a woman explained, in Spanish, the college scholarship earmarked for his 11-year-old son.
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Almost every night, it sometimes seems, Hollywood's top performers, producers and moguls don black tie and Versace gown and gather in a hotel ballroom on the West Side to salute the humanitarian accomplishments of one of their own. Piles of money are raised for charity, and the image is conveyed to the public that Hollywood is generously giving back to the community some of the billions it collects for keeping the nation entertained.
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