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El Camino Real Highway

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2003 | Brady MacDonald, Times Staff Writer
Underneath the asphalt ribbons of Interstate 5 and U.S. 101 that form the state's backbone lies an 18th-century dirt path that predestined where Californians would live, work and play for generations to come. El Camino Real began more than 300 years ago as a link between what would become a trail of 21 missions in California and many more in Baja California. The 2,000-mile route, stretching from the tip of the Baja Peninsula to the Bay Area, passed through modern-day Orange County along the way.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2003 | Brady MacDonald, Times Staff Writer
Underneath the asphalt ribbons of Interstate 5 and U.S. 101 that form the state's backbone lies an 18th-century dirt path that predestined where Californians would live, work and play for generations to come. El Camino Real began more than 300 years ago as a link between what would become a trail of 21 missions in California and many more in Baja California. The 2,000-mile route, stretching from the tip of the Baja Peninsula to the Bay Area, passed through modern-day Orange County along the way.
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NEWS
September 1, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Camino Real, the route that connects California's 21 Spanish missions, runs more than 600 miles from San Diego to Sonoma. Along the way, it passes not only through Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Carmel, but straight through the psyche of modern Californians. In that latter landscape it is lined with the historical truths and romantic myths that comprise the way California chooses to remember its roots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998 | LINN GROVES
The City Council recently accepted the gift of two free-standing bell markers from the Rancho Viejo Junior Women's Club. The bells will mark the city's portion of the historic El Camino Real route, which Franciscan monks blazed from Tijuana to Sonoma starting in 1769. The bells also will help celebrate the state's 150th birthday (sesquicentennial). The markers, about 10 feet tall with a single bell at the top, are valued at about $1,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The place on the road is nondescript, like any of a thousand intersections along the highway. An Arco station sits at one corner, directly across from a white beach house near sands populated by surfers and sunbathers. This is where the city of San Clemente begins. It is also where Pacific Coast Highway ends forever, becoming El Camino Real through the rest of Orange County.
NEWS
August 31, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The journey begins here, where modern California began. Here, on once barren, now verdant Presidio Hill, Junipero Serra founded the first Spanish mission in California in the summer of 1769. His companions were sick, and he faced bleak prospects, but his faith was as a mule. In time, the California missions would number 21 and stretch like beads on a rosary from San Diego to Santa Barbara to Sonoma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998 | LINN GROVES
The City Council recently accepted the gift of two free-standing bell markers from the Rancho Viejo Junior Women's Club. The bells will mark the city's portion of the historic El Camino Real route, which Franciscan monks blazed from Tijuana to Sonoma starting in 1769. The bells also will help celebrate the state's 150th birthday (sesquicentennial). The markers, about 10 feet tall with a single bell at the top, are valued at about $1,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1987 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
A 50- to 100-pound bag of chemical pigment that fell off a truck and broke open on Interstate 5 near the Carmel Valley Road exit caused a monumental traffic snarl Thursday, as authorities shut down all four southbound lanes of the busy freeway for several hours, and northbound rubber-neckers turned their half of the highway into a parking lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some of the most exciting art in the county at the moment is made of tin. Through this weekend, the Carnegie Art Museum is filled with patiently and passionately crafted works in tin, a material that has particular significance in Mexican history. "Impressions in Tin: Mexican Tin Works" is an illuminating traveling show that originated at the Mexican Museum in San Francisco. Its arrival in Southern California has special meaning, considering the proximity of its source.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1996
This year, volunteer architects, engineers and students from the University of Pennsylvania arrived at the venerable Mission San Juan Capistrano before the swallows. Their mission: stabilize the decaying Great Stone Church so it can be maintained as a ruin. The church was partially destroyed by an earthquake in 1812 and never rebuilt. The work is part of a $19.5-million project that would refurbish various parts of the entire mission property.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
El Camino Real, the route that connects California's 21 Spanish missions, runs more than 600 miles from San Diego to Sonoma. Along the way, it passes not only through Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Carmel, but straight through the psyche of modern Californians. In that latter landscape it is lined with the historical truths and romantic myths that comprise the way California chooses to remember its roots.
NEWS
August 31, 1997 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The journey begins here, where modern California began. Here, on once barren, now verdant Presidio Hill, Junipero Serra founded the first Spanish mission in California in the summer of 1769. His companions were sick, and he faced bleak prospects, but his faith was as a mule. In time, the California missions would number 21 and stretch like beads on a rosary from San Diego to Santa Barbara to Sonoma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The place on the road is nondescript, like any of a thousand intersections along the highway. An Arco station sits at one corner, directly across from a white beach house near sands populated by surfers and sunbathers. This is where the city of San Clemente begins. It is also where Pacific Coast Highway ends forever, becoming El Camino Real through the rest of Orange County.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | KEVIN BRASS
Going to the movies is what 43% of North County residents say they do when they go out for the evening. It is an activity most popular with newcomers. Of those who have lived in the area two years or less, 57% name it as what they do ; o f those who 've lived in North County more than 20 years, 29% name movies. --The Times Poll The Wiegand Plaza Theater complex has a cappuccino bar, which pretty well sums up the state of North County movie theaters.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | NANCY RAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bulldozers on once-pristine hillsides serve as constant reminders of the more crowded, urbane region in North County's future. Harder to find, but still all around, are the signs of history, dating back thousands, even millions of years. When North County people think of the area's past, they usually conjure up memories of a rainbow of flower fields as far as the eye could see along Interstate 5 south of Carlsbad, of plump pumpkins polka-dotting green fields in the San Dieguito River Valley.
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