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El Centro Wilshire Family Center

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1988
Contrary to what I'm quoted as saying in your June 19 article, "Tchaikovsky and the Gang," (by Douglas Sadownick), I don't believe the Police Department wants to close the El Centro Wilshire Family Center. I also did not observe the department's CRASH program (Community Resources Against Street Hoodlums) as suffering "confusion between keeping the peace and unconscious racism." I am careful to avoid generalizations like "cops are racist" and "gang members are criminals." Gangs have been a part of our communities for a long time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1988
Dance students of El Centro Wilshire Family Center, including about 25 Salvadoran gang members, will get to see some arabesques after all--compliments of Joffrey Ballet. The ballet company had rescinded 100 free tickets for El Centro because of fears of gang violence. The students include members of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, which police called "one of the more violent and criminally inclined in the city."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1988 | EDWARD J. BOYER, Times Staff Writer
Dance teachers at the El Centro Wilshire Family Center had been excitedly anticipating taking their students, including about 25 gang members, to see their first ballet Sunday at the Music Center. But that was before the Joffrey Ballet company's representative called Wednesday to tell officials at El Centro that the 100 complimentary tickets given to the youngsters and their families would not be honored.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Something is afoot in MacArthur Park this lazy August afternoon--and it's got nothing to do with drugs or gangs. "One . . . two," a doe-eyed young woman commands from the band-shell stage, as a retinue of aspiring ballerinas in tutus jete to boom-box Tchaikovsky. Three boys skid their bikes to a standstill, leaning forward on the handlebars to watch. Nearby, rows of wooden benches fill with sundry onlookers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1988 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
The Latino kid with the knife tattoo kicks his Puma sneaker high in the gymnasium sky. One (boom!) after another (bam!), the shirtless, sweaty teen-age dancers follow in the footsteps of their fellow homeboy (gang member). All 20 punch knees, slap hands, stretch hamstrings and slam heels on the foul line of a B-ball court that's thick with body odor and Salvadoran catcalls.
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