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El Pueblo Gallery

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visitors to El Pueblo Gallery on Olvera Street keep asking why it is presenting a landmark exhibit on early Chinese settlers in the historically Mexican neighborhood. Curator Suellen Cheng said they are surprised when she explains that Olvera Street--known as the birthplace of Los Angeles--was by the 1870s also home to Chinese immigrants. "Mexicans and Chinese lived and worked side by side," she tells visitors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visitors to El Pueblo Gallery on Olvera Street keep asking why it is presenting a landmark exhibit on early Chinese settlers in the historically Mexican neighborhood. Curator Suellen Cheng said they are surprised when she explains that Olvera Street--known as the birthplace of Los Angeles--was by the 1870s also home to Chinese immigrants. "Mexicans and Chinese lived and worked side by side," she tells visitors.
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NEWS
December 26, 1993 | IRIS YOKOI
Visitors can imagine how the holidays were spent 120 years ago in Los Angeles at an exhibit at the El Pueblo Gallery at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument on Olvera Street. "Treasures of El Pueblo," which runs through Jan. 16, depicts how rooms at the historic Pico House, the most elegant hotel in Southern California in the 1870s, might have looked during the Christmas season more than a century ago.
NEWS
March 12, 2002
Los Angeles Media & Education Center needs volunteers to mentor and tutor in performing arts, visual arts and crafts, and reading and writing skills. Bob Guenette, (310) 785-9312. * Trauma Intervention Programs in Orange County needs volunteers to help local police and fire departments respond to traumatized residents after tragic events. Training begins Thursday. (714) 314-0744.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The image of joyous Mexican children dancing across the canvas is brought to life by the oil painting's bold, vigorous color. So it's inevitably a surprise to visitors at Olvera Street that the artist who has so skillfully depicted the gay fiesta scene speaks only a smattering of Spanish and has never traveled farther into Mexico than Tijuana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2004 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
The images were stark: black-and-white representations of the grittier parts of being a teen in Los Angeles. Their subjects were disturbing: One focused on the forearm of a teenage cutter; another showed the gravestone of a boy who died days before his 18th birthday.
NEWS
March 21, 1996 | JILL STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Awise man once said that art makes us human, and if sculptor and painter Samuel Brantley had to pick a philosophy of life, that maxim would be it. Art, after all, has lifted him above his own brutal life, a strange journey that began in Virginia when he was 8, with his father killing his mother and his brother then killing his father, and culminated more recently in his own hard times after he lost the roof over his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2001 | ROBERT SHUSTER, Robert Shuster is a freelance writer in Seattle
In Houston, you can sit in the pews of the 75-year-old former Church of Christ, and watch eclectic screenings of short experimental videos and films purchased at yard sales. Last summer, a theater in an old Los Angeles bank showed three-minute video "confessions" about living in the city, all of which were shot by the confessors in the bank's vault.
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